POLITICAL SCIENCE (POS)

POS 101 - UNITED STATES POLITICS

The processes and functions of US governmental institutions; Constitutional framework; relationship between politics and the economy; relationship between the states and the national government; political culture; participation and representation; contemporary public policy problems.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

POS 102 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Diverse governments and political systems; how to understand and compare them. Various methods for analyzing developing and industrialized countries.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

POS 103 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Major international problems of our day. Power; American foreign policy; problems in the Third World. Principles underlying international relations; reliable research resources.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

POS 104 - INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY

How should we understand the relationship between the individual and the state? What gives a state authority, and what are the limits of that authority? What is liberty and what is the role of the state in protecting and promoting liberty? How should power be distributed? These are enduring questions in political thought. In this class we consider the ways that Western political thought has answered these questions, and raise alternative possibilities by considering perspectives such as feminism, indigenous traditions, socialism, and anarchism.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

POS 200 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES

Various ways of conceptualiziang social justice; how the social sciences can be used to understand questions of social justice; case studies in collective action for social justice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Course Notes: Completion UWR

POS 210 - RACE IN U.S. POLITICS

Race has played a central role in U.S. politics from colonial days through the present. This class considers the persistence of systemic inequity in the U.S. as well as resistance and liberation movements in response to social, political, and economic oppression. Contemporary issues are considered through the lens of historic and continued structural racism within the U.S., paying particular attention to the role of the state and political actors in creating and perpetuating systemic racial disparities through public policy and political rhetoric.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Course Notes: Open to freshmen., No additional credit given for "RACE IN AMERICAN POLITICS

POS 241 - PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES

Every four years, both Democrats and Republicans hold an elaborate, year-long spectacle to choose their party's presidential nominee. Typically beginning with televised debates more than 6 months before the first contest, the primaries are fought across all 50 states, many of which use radically different procedures to choose delegates, and only conclude with the party's summer nominating convention. Where did this system come from? Why do both parties let Iowa and New Hampshire go first? How much influence do party elites have over the nomination process? Why do candidates tend to win their home states? What kind of voters turn out for these elections? In this course, we will critically analyze the history of American presidential primaries, from the early 20th century reform era to the crucial reforms of the 1970s. We will also build understanding of how nominees are chosen, and whether the U.S. primary process could stand another round of significant reform. And of course, we will spend considerable time analyzing the 2020 race for the Democratic and Republican nominations for president.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

Course Notes: Completion UWR

POS 250B - URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

What is “environmental justice”? How is environmental justice different than “environmentalism” or “conservation”? How and why has use (and abuse) of the earth’s resources in the US (and Chicago specifically) become unequal? How can individuals, governments, and communities restore greater justice? What are the stakes if we fail to do so? These are some of the questions we will engage this course, as well as generating new ones. Protecting rights may be the ultimate justification for government. Yet here and elsewhere, governments fail to protect, and often violate, basic rights. The US considers itself an exemplar of justice, but allows some parts of the population to consume huge amounts of the earth’s resources, through systematic deprivation of other parts of the population. Residents of urban areas have been, traditionally, simultaneously the ones most likely to be exposed to environmental ills and the most unlikely to benefit from environmental goods (including safe drinking water, clean air, safe soil, uncontaminated watersheds, and safe outdoor spaces). This has created, for many communities, systematic and mutually reinforcing disadvantages. Increasing disconnection from nature can create greater atomism, lack of social capital, and lack of political power make it particularly hard to advocate for greater social and environmental justice for the very people who have most born the burdens of injustices. This state of affairs presents an inescapable practical and ethical challenge that we must meet. Therefore we will explore cases of environmental injustice here in the Chicago area, through site visits and partnerships with outside experts. The course will engage us in local-level investigations of global political and social trends.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

POS 250C - PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES & IDEAS

This course provides students with an understanding of concepts and tools for measuring health in populations. In addition they will be able to comprehend and characterizes the relationship of the public health system with medical care and other elements of the overall health system and identify the government’s unique contributions through federal, state, and local public health agencies. Public health broadly involves an array of biological, environmental, social, cultural, behavior, and service utilization factors that are all associated with health. Underlying this is an understanding that the success or failure of the collective actions and decisions thus we are all accountable to each other in order to produce the best results. To that end the class, through case studies, will also focus on ways in which positive changes can be made in order to improve these systems and individuals within them in order to move them towards improved quality and quantity of health for all.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

POS 280 - SPECIAL TOPICS

Topics vary, check schedule

Credits: 3

Course Notes: .

POS 292 - NORTH KOREA & NUCLEAR SECURITY

This course examines the controversy surrounding the nuclear program pursued by North Korea. Examining the history of diplomacy from the Agreed Framework of 1994 to the collapse of negotiations in the Bush Administration, students will explore issues of nuclear security and nuclear war as they apply to North Korea and around the world. By understanding the history of the conflict, as well as key concepts in the study of nuclear security, students will gain fluency in nuclear debates as well as understanding of the political dynamics guiding the renewed hostility between the Trump Administration and the regime of Kim Jong-un.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

POS 295 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credits: 1-3

POS 302 - PROBLEMS IN U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Organization of US government for conduct of foreign policy. Case studies of military, economic, and political foreign affairs.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 102 or POS 103

POS 308 - SLAVERY, RACE, AND THE LAW

This course will explore the interaction of slavery, race, and the law in the United States from colonial times through Reconstruction. Politics, economics, culture, and the law all played a role in shaping the institution of slavery as well as modern conceptions of race. The course reading will include both secondary works and original documents, including excerpts of trial transcripts, Supreme Court decisions, state legal codes, and first-person narratives. We will focus on a number of larger issues, such as the role legal codes played in creating racial identities, how race shaped notions of citizenship, and how slavery influenced the Constitution.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101

POS 311 - POVERTY POLICY

This course focuses on the policy processes, historical context, and sociocultural issues surrounding antipoverty policy in the United States, including how poverty is defined and applied. In understanding poverty and antipoverty policy in the United States this course pays particular attention to issues of place, gender, and race.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: 9 Credit Hours of Soc. Sciences

POS 315 - EDUCATION FINANCE POLICY

This course is designed for students who will examine school finance from various perspectives: historical, governmental (local, state and federal); political; philosophical; and practical. The course will cover topics from the essentials of school funding and budget preparation, to debt financing and retirement systems. Course assignments will emphasize analysis of school district finances and available data. Learning activities are designed to focus on practical issues in school finance and topics of interest to students.”

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

Course Notes: This course examines school finance from various perspective, : historical, governmental (local, state and federal);, course will cover topics from the essentials of school, funding and budget preparation,, to debt financing and retirement systems.

POS 319 - THE WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN: HAMILTON'S AMERICA

This course explores the political changes leading to the American Revolution along with the intellectual, cultural and social revolutions that occurred during the eighteenth century. Family relations, consumer behavior, even the way people spoke—all underwent profound transformations. While the American Revolution gave birth to a new political order, these other revolutions gave birth to a new way of being in the world, one that continues to shape our lives.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: (POS 101 and ENG 102) or 3 Credit Hours of History

POS 320 - UNITED STATES CONGRESS

Give students an understanding of the US Congress and its nature of representation within a representative democracy. It will examinethe origin anid development of Congressional institutions. It will also explore the effects of parties, committee leadership, lobbying, elections, the bureaucracy, media, and constituent's demands on Congress. Additionally, will cover the impact of the other branches of government such as the judiciary and executive branches in relationship to how Congress governs.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

POS 324 - POLITICS & LITERATURE

Works of literature that explore significant political themes, such as alienation, revolutionary movements, utopias, and anti-utopias and the development and expression of political, social, economic, religious, and philosophical ideas.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 104 or POS 329 or 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

POS 325 - TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVES ON WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS

In the US and the Netherlands, both democracies, the most basic processes of criminal justice too often fail due to flawed judicial processes and weaknesses in the structure of the criminal justice system. This state of affairs presents an inescapable practical and ethical challenge that we must meet. In order to do so, we must discover the unique challenges and opportunities presented by our own political context. We can only do this fully when we view our own context in comparative perspective. In this course we will explore, especially, cases of wrongful conviction, here and abroad, through distance learning that virtually combines students and faculty at Roosevelt and the University of Tilburg, and will include in-person guest lectures on the part of each faculty member on the others’ campus

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies

Prerequisites: POS 102 or POS 103

Course Notes: or instructor consent.

POS 326 - FOOD JUSTICE:FOOD POLICY IN US

This course considers the complicated politics of food regulation, production, distribution, and consumption. During the semester we will discuss how food policy is made and its practical impacts. We will look at the world of agricultural lobbying, subsidies, and policy making. We will consider consumer rights, worker rights, and environmental justice issues within food production. And, we will examine some of the various social movements that have emerged in response to these issues, including the growing food sovereignty movement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: 9 Credit Hours of Soc. Sciences

POS 329 - PHILOSOPHY OF LAW

Philosophic issues and theories concerning the nature of law, the role of the judiciary, justifications of punishment, types of liability, and considerations of justice. Practical application of theory is made to cases considering such policy topics as the death penalty, equal protection, workplace discrimination, and class-based discrimination.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 104

Course Notes: or consent; Political Science and/or Philosophy recommended

POS 334 - VOTING POLICY

This course examines voting from an operational perspective. The course provides students a working knowledge of theories and practices related to organizing elections and ensuring that votes are fairly cast and accurately counted. In addition, the course explores current trends such as redistricting and campaigning that affect the fairness of elections. Finally, the course considers the effect of partisanship, campaigns and media on voting decisions.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

POS 338 - FIELD INTERNSHIP IN POLITICS AND LAW

Students work in Chicago-area political and legal organizations. Required paper based on relevant readings and analysis of work experiences. Early consultation necessary to arrange appropriate placement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

Course Notes: Six courses in major and consent of instructor.

POS 339 - POLITICAL VIOLENCE & TERRORISM

This course explores the nature, causes and effects of contemporary terrorism. What is terrorism and who defines it? Is terrorism modern or is it a recurring feature of global political history? What are the goals of terrorism, and who is the audience? What causes terrorism, and what strategies have governments and organizations pursued to diminish or end it? The course addresses the long history of terrorism, the role of states in promoting and fighting it and then focuses primarily on the global rise of terrorism beginning in the 1960s through 9/11 and the "War on Terror.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 103

POS 340 - THE UNITED STATES PRESIDENCY

Contemporary and historical perspectives on the presidency. Elements of presidential power; presidential selection; politics of the presidency; presidential personality; president and media; relations of president with courts, Congress, and bureaucracy. See Libs 340.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

POS 343 - TOPICS: ECONOMIC JUSTICE IN URBAN SETTING

Examination of selected human rights problems and efforts to address them in Chicago, followed by comparisons with conditions and efforts in another city abroad. Comparisons are used by students to generate solutions to difficult local problems.

Credits: 3-6

Attributes: International Studies, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 102 or POS 103

POS 348 - POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

This course examines the domestic and international causes of, and responses to, climate change. We will discuss international legal and scientific responses, battles over control of the scientific agenda, responses within both developed and developing nations, and proposed strategies of adaptation.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 103

POS 352 - HEALTH POLICY

Health policy examines the development by government and other policy makers of present and future objectives pertaining to health care and the health care system. It will focus on the articulation of arguments and decisions regarding these objectives in legislation, judicial opinions, regulations, guidelines, standards, and key health policy influences that affect health care and public health. This includes the role of economic, technological, social, cultural and other influences on policy development; and the effects of resulting policies, guidelines, standards and protocols.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

POS 358 - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Exploration of the international politics of the Middle East, tracing the development of Western interests in the region. Instead of exploring the region from the perspective of the West, however, the course will take seriously the foreign policy histories and goals of the states of the Middle East, exploring regional rivalries, energy politics, the rise and fall of pan-Arab nationalism, the so-called "War on Terror", and the enduring significance of the Arab-Israeli conflict for regional politics.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 103

Course Notes: or consent.

POS 362 - URBAN POLITICS: THE WIRE AND URBAN AMERICA

This course will use HBO’s The Wire as a lens for exploring various problems afflicting urban America today. We will study the show in its own right as an artistic product worthy of investigation (some critics have called it the greatest television show ever made), and we will use the show as a springboard for thinking about inequality, crime and punishment, work and labor markets, education, and politics. The assigned readings will analyze social, economic, political and cultural factors that shape the experiences of the urban poor and that have created the kind of urban landscape depicted in The Wire.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 (may be taken concurrently) or POS 200 (may be taken concurrently) or SOCJ 201 (may be taken concurrently)

Course Notes: consent

POS 363 - URBAN POLICY

Policies and policy-making processes at all levels of government that shape quality of life in metropolitan areas; relationship between political and market processes; class, gender, racial, and regional consequences of different policies.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

POS 367 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

This course examines current trends in social movements, looking at examples in both the U.S. and international contexts. Emphasis is on radical social movements seeking systemic transformation of social, economic, and political institutions. We will consider not only the societal power dynamics these movements seek to change but the power dynamics at play within the movements themselves, paying particular attention to issues of intersectionality. Some questions the course addresses: How do movements emerge? What does it mean for movements to exist within a globally-networked world? How do movements that address different issues develop solidarity across movements? What are the implications for community organizing?

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: 9 Credit Hours of Soc. Sciences

Course Notes: with minimum grade of a C. Instructor consent.

POS 368 - OIL AND TROUBLE: AMERICA IN THE MIDDLE EAST

This course examines the policy history of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, since 1945, seeking to understand the economic, ideological and geostrategic importance of the region to American interests. Since the end of WWII, the U.S. has become progressively more involved in the politics of the Middle East, from Eisenhower’s intervention in Lebanon in 1958 to the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Drawing on theories of international relations and foreign policymaking, this course is designed to help students understand why this happened, why leaders made the choices they did, and to sort through the consequences. Students will also develop the policy analysis skills sought by leading government agencies and non-profit organizations in the field.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 102 or POS 103

POS 372 - ISSUES IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC POLICY

Interaction of policy making and implementation; selected issues in public policy; impact of politics on administration.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

Course Notes: or consent of the instructor.

POS 374 - UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This course focuses on major aspects of American constitutional law, including the debates at the Constitutional Convention, the separation of powers, federalism, and other significant areas of constitutional debate. Particular attention is given to the Supreme Court's interpretation of these issues.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

POS 375 - CIVIL RIGHTS & CIVIL LIBERTIES

This course examines the relationship between the government and individuals by focusing on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Bill of Rights and includes consideration of topics such as discrimination on the basis of race or sex, freedoms of speech and religion, and the right to privacy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Legal Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 and ENG 102

Course Notes: consent.

POS 379 - POLARIZATION AND PARTISANSHIP

Americans are more deeply divided about politics than ever before. Not only do voters express sharply divergent views about policies, they increasingly view members of the other party as a threat to the future of the country. What explains this dangerous movement away from a shared understanding of power-sharing in a democracy? In this course we will critically examine contemporary American political parties and discuss different theories for what causes polarization and partisan commitment. And we will search for ways to bring Americans together, reduce hyper-partisanship and negative feelings and pursue policies that represent sincere attempts to help all citizens.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 or POS 102 or POS 103

POS 385 - COLLAPSE OF THE POST-WAR POLITICAL ORDER

In the years following World War II, the United States experienced a period of unprecedented economic expansion, unrivalled world power, and a political consensus that American-style liberalism was leading the nation into an era of peace and prosperity. By the 1960s, though, the country faced a series of challenges to these optimistic assumptions. Attacks from the left and the right left the post-war liberal consensus in tatters and eventually led to a resurgent conservative movement. We will explore the collapse of the post-war order both domestically and internationally and attempt to understand the forces that have led to our current political moment.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101

POS 390 - TOPICS: U.S. POLITICS

Topics vary by semester.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: POS 101 (may be taken concurrently) and ENG 102 (may be taken concurrently)

POS 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Individual projects pursued under an instructor's supervision.

Credits: 1-6

Attributes: Social Science