JOURNALISM AND MEDIA STUDIES (JMS)

JMS 203 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA THEORY

Body of theory in the study of media, including the content, form, consumption, and their effects. The course will assist students in developing critical thinking skills as they explore a range of theories that guide and ground media studies. The goal of this exploration is to make theory accessible so that students can develop a basic understanding of roles of theory in research and practice.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 210 - WHAT IS TRUTH/FAKE NEWS?

There's no quick fix for the challenges of "fake news" and "alternative facts." Course focuses on development of critical thinking skills needed to explore the boundaries, using newspapers, magazines, videos and internet resources, of our socially constructed, digital reality. This course looks at varied concepts of truth throughout history and across cultural contexts, with particular attention to similarities and differences with the modern, science-based concept of "fact."

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 101

JMS 219 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION

Students apply technical knowledge and skills to multimedia production situations, sampling a variety of production work through active individual and team participation.Course may look at current topics such as media issues, professional multimedia production techniques, changing media technology, job market information.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201 (may be taken concurrently)

JMS 220 - MEDIA WRITING

News writing and reporting principles, interview techniques, classroom and outside writing practice; introduction to writing appropriate to print, broadcast and online journalism; fundamentals of writing, grammar, style. Course meets for five hours weekly and includes writing in lab.

Credits: 4

Prerequisites: COMM 201 (may be taken concurrently)

JMS 226 - PRODUCING FOR COLLEGE MEDIA

Students in this class serve as writers for the Torch, the weekly college newspaper, and for its website/ they also may produce content for other student media, WRBC The Blaze radio station or RU Fire, the broadcast club. Students get hands-on experience in print, broadcast and online journalism and interact with students editors/ producers. The class will be divided between classroom time and outside reporting.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Open to All Majors

JMS 230 - TELLING SOCIAL JUSTICE STORIES 2.0 HON

Black Lives Matter, Me Too, LGBTQ & You: Telling the stories of social justice in the 21st century. Combining age-old reporting and new-age digital technology, students will learn to capture the faces, voices and narratives of today's most visible social movements. Students will study the role of the media in advancing social movements. Course culminates in a final multimedia project. Learn how to tell professional quality stories that matter.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Lab/Course Fee $60.00

JMS 240 - DEMOCRACY: THE WORST FORM OF GOVERNMENT?

This course focuses on American democracy as a lived experience. Students will apply critical thinking to both confirm and challenge their concepts of, and beliefs about democratic government considering: the benefits of democracy; the flaws/limitations inherent in democracy; the citizen’s obligations in a working democracy; courts and the rule of law; individual and group influence; the electoral system, its benefits and liabilities; and the role and responsibilities of media.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 101

JMS 260 - RIDING THE RED LINE

Chicago’s Red Line “L” train is a tale of two cities connected by one train: The system connects thousands of passengers to destinations daily but also demonstrates a stark disconnect, including a glaring mix of ethnic diversity and socio-economic gaps, as seen as rider demographics shift from one side of town to the other. Students will document their virtual Red Line journeys via observations through print and multimedia coverage.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: C or better grade is required for students using, this course as elective in their majors in Integrated, Marketing Communications or Journalism, and Media Studies

JMS 282 - PHOTOJOURNALISM

Focus on building skills needed in producing images for today’s media and in using technology for visual storytelling. Basic photographic techniques, including camera operation, lighting, composition, and photo reproduction techniques for print or computer-mediated applications. Emphasis on using the camera as a reporting tool. Basic use of digital imaging and editing software; ethical issues in photojournalism. Cameras provided by the department.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JMS 220 or JOUR 220 or IMC 220

JMS 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS: MEDIA STUDIES

Course content varies by semester but always focuses on current issues and/or diversity, alternative media, and social justice as they relate to media.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 305 - VIDEO PRODUCTION

This course will introduce students to the technology and techniques necessary to bring news reports to life in video for use on news websites or an array of other news media outlets. Students will learn how to collect, edit and present broadcast quality videos to complement news reports across a variety of subjects.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: IMC 220 or JMS 220

JMS 307 - VISUAL STORYTELLING

An exploration of visual storytelling, including documentary and journalistic work. Camera usage, concepts and techniques, shooting assignments, slide lectures, and computer work using photo and video editing programs. No previous photography or video experience required. Cameras will be provided for the semester.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

Course Notes: Previously offered as "DOCUMENTARY VIDEO STORYTELLING

JMS 310 - HISTORY OF JOURNALISM

Development of journalism from European antecedents of the American colonial press through trends developing during the 21st century. Examines US newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and other media.

Credits: 3

JMS 319 - MULTIMEDIA REPORTING

Field reporting course with emphasis on writing detailed or complex stories from student-initiated beat coverage, interviews, on- or off-campus events, and assignments; research and writing from documents and press conferences.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220 or IMC 220 or JMS 220

JMS 321 - PHOTOBOOK HISTORY & PRACTICE

History and practice of the photobook. Students will photograph a major subject over the course of the semester, edit the photographs, and layout and publish a photobook. Basic Photoshop, camera technique, and the history of the photobook will also be covered. Both film and digital cameras can be used for the course.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 322 - FEATURE WRITING

Reporting and writing of short- and long-form articles, including profiles, for newspapers, magazines, online media; using observation, conversation, description and character/plot development in writing journalistic article.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: IMC 220

JMS 325 - PHOTOGRAPHY

Introduction to black and white film-based photography. Basic camera and darkroom techniques. Cameras provided by the department. Students provide some supplies.

Credits: 3

JMS 328 - DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY

An exploration of documentary photography consisting of camera usage, shooting assignments, slide lectures, and computer work using Photoshop. No previous photography experience required. Cameras will be provided for the semester. This course will introduce the computer as a powerful tool for the photographer. We will discuss the ethical, philosophical and practical considerations regarding digital imaging. We will be using flat-bed scanners, 35mm slide and negative scanners, and digital cameras for inputting images into the computer. Adobe Lightroom will be our primary imaging program.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

Course Notes: C or better grade required to use in, majors in Department of Communication.

JMS 329 - WHITENESS IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY

Team-taught course in sociology and journalism. International travel course exploring Whiteness in NZ and Australia. This is a six-credit course with instruction split between the classroom and instruction time during travel. During travel, students are required to attend all scheduled visits to museums, libraries, lectures, and other sites. Students are required to keep a travel (field notes/reporting) journal and to make daily entries during the trip.

Credits: 6

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 330 - IPHONE/DEMOCRATIC CAMERA

Everyone is a photographer and cameraphones are everywhere. This course will explore the creative and ethical implications of using the iPhone as an artistic and journalistic tool. Students must have an iPhone X or newer to enroll in the course, and will be expected to download various photography apps for use in the class. We will use the iPhone to create, edit, and post photographic work online. Students will learn a new set of photographic standards, applications, and practices through individual and group shooting assignments, readings, and examples of contemporary photographic work.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 339 - WRITING: THE DOCUMENTARY AESTHETIC

Course will examine the influence of the documentary aesthetic on American literature and consider, as well, the problems of documentary, the questions of representation and ethics that haunt it. Study of what the documentary tradition can give to contemporary nonfiction, how today’s writers can transform documentary to suit their times and their purposes. Students are expected to complete a polished piece of documentary nonfiction and a critical paper.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220 or IMC 220 or ENG 153

JMS 342 - POLITICS: ON THE TRAIL OF THE PRIMARY

This is a rotating Journalism topics course dealing with journalistic writing and reporting on coverage of politics in America. Every fourth year, concurrent with the presidential election cycle, this course will center on either the primaries (spring) or election (fall). In other years, this course will deal with journalistic coverage of other political matters, congressional or mayoral elections, or in general politics and the media.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 343 - PRODUCING DOC PHOTO EXHIBITION

Conceptualizing, editing, and producing a documentary photography exhibition using student and/or professional work. Working together, students will generate ideas for an exhibition in the Gage Gallery, locate/produce work, and install the project in the gallery. The class will focus on the practice of curating a photography exhibition, which will include developing a theme and choosing work, writing statements/artist biographies, and promoting the exhibit to the community.

Credits: 3

JMS 345 - CROSSCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Communication styles and characteristics of various cultural groups. Understanding and recognizing barriers (semantics, nonverbal behavior, stereotypes, and assumed similarities) that affect communication among cultures. Fulfills the non-Western requirement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 348 - PINHOLE TO CAMERA PHONE

The history and practice of early, middle-period, and contemporary photography. Slide examples of the history of photography; hands-on work with pinhole cameras, large format cameras, digital cameras, and camera phones. Field trips to galleries and/or museums in the city to view examples of work presented in the class.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Lab fee $60

JMS 350 - EDITING

Emphasis on grammar, usage, copy editing, headline writing; overview of editorial processes and standards; introduction to layout and design, and photo editing. Recommended elective for journalism majors who choose no concentration.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 351 - PUBLIC OPINION & PROPAGANDA

Factors in public opinion formation; techniques and uses of public opinion polling; definition, identification, and socially positive and negative uses of propaganda.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 354 - PUBLICATION DESIGN

Theories of design and practical experience with creating layout and using photos and art in newspapers, magazines, newsletters, online publications. Students will use Adobe InDesign software for hands-on layout exercises. Students use InDesign software for design.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220

JMS 355 - MAGAZINE WRITING

Research and writing of articles for the contemporary magazine.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220 or IMC 220 or CRWR 153

JMS 357 - MAGAZINE PRODUCTION

Research, writing, design, and production of magazine. Students learn the use of Adobe InDesign for page layout and creation of a magazine prototype.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220

JMS 363 - LAW AND ETHICS

First Amendment rights and responsibilities; libel and slander; legal access to public meetings and documents; restrictions on print and broadcast media; newsgathering considerations; ethical decision making. Journalism students register for a 3-credit-hour lecture and the 1-credit hour Journalism discussion section.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 365 - BRAND STORYTELLING

The variety and styles of content marketing including big brands, niche storytelling, video events, nonprofit research papers. Content marketing requires excellent reporting and writing skills: Students will develop story ideas for particular brands, audiences and platforms including the web, social media, and a customer magazine; will conduct research, reporting, and interviews; and will learn to tell nonfiction stories while cognizant of diversity, cultural awareness, and fairness in reporting, design, editing.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 220 or IMC 220 or JMS 220

JMS 373 - EXAMINING MEDIA ETHICS

An investigation of mass-mediated communication, and information as a mass commodity, on values, particularly the value of truth. In an age of information glut, where every possible point of view is represented, all points of view appear to have the same value. Having "values" demands the evaluation of ideas–seeing which ones are "better" than others. This course seeks to help the student find certainty in a culture of confusion.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 102

JMS 375 - MEDIA CRITICISM

Students use newspapers, magazines and the Internet in applying contemporary criticism to current media issues and performance. Emphasizes the social impact of mass media messages.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: COMM 201

JMS 390 - TOPICS IN REPORTING & WRITING

Course content varies by term but may include Literary Journalism, Feature Writing, Investigative Reporting, Editorial and Column Writing, Magazine Writing, Business Writing, Personal Memoir Writing, Science/Medical Writing, Covering Government, Review Writing, Technical Writing, Business Writing, Newsletter Writing, Travel Writing, or Writing for Radio.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JMS 220

JMS 392 - THE MULTIMEDIA PROJECT

Capstone course for journalism majors, focusing on production of a final reporting project on a selected topic and presented in print, video, and web formats.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 319 or JMS 319

JMS 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent projects in journalism and media studies in which students work closely with a faculty supervisor. Students must consult faculty first on their project ideas, then plan for their independent project in consultation with their faculty supervisor. The faculty supervisor must be designated before the student registers for the independent study.

Credits: 1-3

Prerequisites: JMS 220

Course Notes: Consent of instructor and department chair.

JMS 399 - MEDIA INTERNSHIP

In-service training with a professional media operation in print, online or broadcast media operations. Students must successfully complete academic reflections and evaluations during their internship term, in addition to successfully completing a single internship totaling at least 200 on-the-job hours, to receive 3 hours of credit. See internship coordinator or departmental office for syllabus.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: JOUR 305 or JMS 305

JMS 399P - THE PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP

Approval of internship coordinator required. This course is designed for students preparing to take the internship course for full (3 hours) credit. Covers internship search strategies, resume preparation, interviewing skills.

Credits: 0

Prerequisites: JMS 220

JMS 399Y - INTERNSHIP CONTINUATION

Available only to students currently carrying over registration (with an "incomplete" or "in progress" grade) for the credit-bearing JMS 399 Internship course. JMS 399Y is available for students needing to extend their original registration to complete their internship work. Students who wish to register for JMS 399Y should consult the internship coordinator, as this registration requires an additional form and the department chair's approval.

Credits: 0

Prerequisites: (JMS 220 or JMS 305) and JMS 399 (may be taken concurrently)