PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

PHIL 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

Basic philosophical questions in metaphysics, theory of knowledge, political theory, ethics, and philosophy of religion. Representative answers to be found in writings of classical and contemporary philosophers.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 102 - PHILOSOPHIES OF LIFE

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 103 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY

A survey of major philosophers and philosophical movements from the ancient world through the 19th century.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 130 - JUSTICE, LIBERTY, EQUALITY

This course covers contemporary problems and theoretical reflections drawn from ancient, modern and contemporary sources about justice, liberty and equality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 203 - THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

Arabian Nights, or as it is sometimes called, One Thousand and One Nights, is one of the great works of world literature. Its influence in both the Arabic world and the west has been immense. But do the many stories that make it up have a common theme? Those stories are told by a young woman, Scheherazade, to keep herself alive. If the king loses interest in the stories she tells each night, he will have her executed; every night is thus a test she must pass. The imaginative stories range over themes that are of the utmost importance in thinking about what the nature of human beings is, ranging from justice to liberty to equality to knowledge to happiness. But if there is one theme that dominates the work it is despotism, and how to combat it. The stories are relatively short, and a joy to read.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Open to first-year students.Philosophy majors or minors, should register for the course as PHIL 203.

PHIL 204 - PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The concepts of God, faith and reason, religious experience, the problem of evil, and religion and morality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

PHIL 206 - PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE

Philosophical problems found in selected novels, short stories, plays, poems, and essays.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 209 - CRITICAL THINKING

Practical training in informal analysis and evaluation of arguments encountered in everyday events.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 210 - LOGIC

Deductive and inductive logic; analysis of propositions and arguments and fallacies of reasoning.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Legal Studies, Social Science

PHIL 219 - WORLD RELIGIONS

A survey of the histories and beliefs of the major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Satisfies non-Western requirement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

PHIL 220 - BUDDHISM

Origins of Buddhism in ancient India. Major schools of Buddhist thought in contrast to Western philosophy. Contemporary Buddhism in the West.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture

PHIL 230 - ETHICS

Classical ethical systems such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Sophomore standing

PHIL 240 - THE ENLIGHTENMENT

This course will examine philosophical and political texts, along with works of drama, music, and art from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These investigations will serve a larger mission of answering the dominant question of this unique period of history: What is Enlightenment?

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

PHIL 250 - ON HAPPINESS

A consideration of alternative conceptions of human fulfillment; among other themes, we will examine the relation of happiness to love, morality, and mortality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 290 - TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

A detailed analysis of a major movement, problem, work, or future in modern or contemporary philosophy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 323 - PERSIAN LETTERS

A study of Montesquieu's eighteenth century epistolary novel,Persian Letters.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in Philosophy or one in Literature required.

PHIL 324 - POLITICS & LITERATURE

A philosophical understanding of political life through the reading of literature. Topics may include oppression, tyranny, compromise, jealousy, friendship, equality, liberty, and justice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Open to students who have taken ONE course in PHIL, ENG, literature (ENG 115 or higher) or POS.

PHIL 326 - PANDEMICS PHILOSOPHERS & POETS

Viruses that cause large numbers of deaths world-wide and spread relatively unabated are more common historically than one might have thought. Pandemic diseases have led philosophers and poets, among others, to reflect on human fragility, mortality, the bonds of human society, pain and anguish, caring, trust, and commitment to others, etc. This course will think through questions about pandemic diseases through readings from Thucydides, Lucretius, Boccaccio's Decameron, Samuel Pepys, Mary Shelley's The Last Man, and Hannah Arendt on loneliness and solitude.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

Course Notes: One course in PHIL with a minimum grade of C required, d or consent of instructor.

PHIL 330 - PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE

A philosophical examination of the fundamental differences between the natural world and the human world and between the world of necessity and the world of artifice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in philosophy.

PHIL 331 - PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY

Social and ethical implications of new technology; problems in contemporary environmental ethics.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 3 SH of PHIL with a min grade of C required or consent, of instructor.

PHIL 342 - POLITICS AND SOCIETY

A philosophical study of the nature of politics and the nature of society. What is the relationship between society and culture? What is the role of art in society? What is politics? Is it a necessary feature of modern life? Why does it take the forms that it does? Why are politics and conflict so tightly knitted together? We will consider these questions through readings drawn from philosophy, sociology, political science, and economics and authors such as Georg Simmel, Hans Speier, Alfred Schutz, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Edward Shils, F.A. Hayek, Annette Baier, Judith Shklar, and Karl Marx.

Credits: 3

PHIL 343 - PHILOSOPHY & TYRANNY

A philosophical study of tyranny through the writings of Sophocles, Herodotus, Xenophon, Plato, Montesquieu, Marx and Hannah Arendt.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 350 - PHILOSOPHY IN FILM

Every film presents to its audience a world and a way of sensing and thinking about that world. Cinema possesses what we might call a thought-function: cinema incites us to think, to think through and with the diverse worlds presented in films. To the extent that philosophy consists in an effort to think clearly and rigorously about the world and the problems it comprises, it follows that there is much of philosophical interest in cinema. In this class, then, we will attend to cinema’s thought-function, endeavoring to think philosophically about cinema—and even, perhaps, to think cinematically about philosophy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL or Literature.

PHIL 355 - EXISTENTIALISM

We will explore issues of human freedom, commitment, vulnerability, and authenticity by reading authors such as Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Camus

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL.

PHIL 361 - METAPHYSICS ANCIENT AND MODERN

Metaphysics Ancient and Modern. We will explore the greatest questions of metaphysics: the relation between speech, being, and soul, between the visible and the intelligible, and between the perishable and the imperishable.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Prerequisites: 3 hrs of PHIL w/min grade of C.

PHIL 371 - HERODOTUS

This is a one book course on Herodotus's 'Histories' a work which is at the same time historical, literary, and philosophical. The themes of the 'Histories' are timely because they are timeless: freedom, slavery, tyranny, oppression, diversity, national character, the power of speech and the power of deed, and eros and its perversions.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in Philosophy required.

PHIL 372 - PLATO ON LOVE

This course is devoted to Plato’s dialogue, The Symposium, the subject of which is love.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 374 - UTOPIAS

A study of literary and philosophical utopias, imaginary best societies, and fictional perfect communities. Dystopian considerations will be raised as well. Books considered may include: Thomas More's Utopia, Lucian’s True Story, Alfarabi's Virtuous Regime, Aristophanes' Birds, Mary Bradley Lane’s Mizora, Irene Clyde’s Beatrice the Sixteenth, Bogdanov’s Red Star, Bacon’s New Atlantis, Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, etc

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 380 - TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

Detailed analysis of a major movement, problem, work, or future in modern or contemporary philosophy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in Philosophy or instr. consent

PHIL 384 - PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHOLOGY

An examination of fundamental psychological concepts (e.g., perception, consciousness, memory, shame, emotions and rationality) from a philosophical perspective.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Study of a particular philosopher, movement, or problem.

Credits: 1-4

Course Notes: Consent

PHIL 399 - SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT

A research project in the student's area of concentration done under the direction of the area advisor or another appropriate faculty member.

Credits: 1-3

Course Notes: Sr.stand. consent