HISTORY (HIST)

HIST 106 - THE UNITED STATES TO 1865

This course examines the interaction of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans from the arrival of the British to the end of the Civil War. It emphasizes the formation and evolution of political, economic, social and religious institutions, and their role in the transformation of everyday life. The course also introduces students to the analysis of historical documents.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

HIST 107 - THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865

This course examines the construction of modern America and an American identity from the age of Reconstruction and the second industrial revolution to the present. It emphasizes the maturation of political, economic, social and religious institutions and their role in the transformation of everyday life. The course also introduces students to the analysis of historical documents.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

HIST 111 - THE WORLD TO 1500

World history from the beginnings of civilizations to the age of discovery, covering several major regions of the world: Southwest Asia, East and South Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Comparison of the civilizations in these regions and contacts between them. Emphasis on social organization, ideas, technologies, and culture.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

HIST 112 - THE WORLD SINCE 1500

This introductory level course takes a global approach to understanding the modern period, 1492 to the present. Readings and lectures will particularly privilege connections between and among Africans, Americans, Asians, and Europeans. Particular events and processes are emphasized, including the ‘discovery’ of the Americas, the advent of plantation slavery, the scientific and industrial revolutions, imperialism, the rise of global trade, the birth of nationalism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and decolonization struggles.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

HIST 201 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES

Various ways of conceptualiziang social justice; how the social sciences can be used to understand questions of social justice; case studies in collective action for social justice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102 (may be taken concurrently)

HIST 221 - WORK & PLAY IN CHICAGO HISTORY

This course explores the spatial and historical dimensions of Chicago as a workplace and site of leisure. In particular, it considers how space and place shaped class solidarity, class conflict and cross-class collaboration during a period of intense industrialization, urbanization and immigration from the late 19th through the first decades of the 20th century. Visiting sites such as Pullman Town, Hull House, along with playgrounds and parks will allow us to discover how the forces of modernity combined with individual agency to define new parameters for work and play in the growing metropolis of Chicago.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Required off-campus field trips during class;, sites accessible by walking or public transit.

HIST 223 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS

A survey of American business history from colonial times to the present with an emphasis on the transformation of American capitalism. The course will consider the nature of a colonial economy based on trade; the economics of slavery; industrialization; entreprenurialism; the rise of big business; and the relationship between government, business and the economy over time. Throughout, the course will probe the intersection of class, race and gender with American business.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Sophomore standing.

HIST 225 - IMMIGRATION IN THE AMERICAS

This course examines the historical push and pull factors that brought Spanish-speaking peoples from the Western Hemisphere into the United States’ political boundaries. The course will place special emphasis on the role of U.S. imperialism in creating conditions that foment emigration. Students will also explore how Spanish-speaking people have adapted to and shaped U.S. society, culture, politics, and the economy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

HIST 226 - LIVES AND TIMES OF FRANKLIN DELANO AND ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

This course focuses on the lives of two extraordinary individuals, for whom our university is named: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Born in the late nineteenth-century, they came of age during a period of intense reform in the 1910s as the Victorian world gave way to modern America. By the 1930s, they occupied the White House where they guided the nation through two major crises: the Great Depression and World War Two. In addition to an examination of their biographies, the course probes their ideas, marriage, politics, leadership qualities and relationship to the times in which they lived, especially the years of the Great Depression and World War Two.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Soph.standing

HIST 228 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY: 1619-1877

Evolution of slavery as a social and economic institution and role of free African Americans in American society up to and during Reconstruction. See Afs 228.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Soph. standing

HIST 229 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY: 1877-PRESENT

Survey of the African-American experience in America with attention to culture and participation in widespread social and political movements. See Afs 229.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Soph. standing

HIST 233 - AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS

This course will interrogate the definitions, chronology, and locations of the civil rights movement in American history.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Sophomore standing

HIST 240 - INTRODUCTION TO AFRICA

Africa from the development of human civilization; migration; formation of kingdoms and territorial states; spread of Islam and Christianity; and intracontinental and intercontinental trading networks. See Afs 240.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Course Notes: Soph. Standing

HIST 241 - AFRICA UNDER EUROPEAN DOMINATION

Origin, nature, and enduring legacies of European colonial domination. Exploration of colonization theories and African responses to colonial domination. See Afs 241.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Course Notes: Sophmore standing

HIST 250 - LIVES, MEMORIES, STORIES, HISTORY

This course will introduce students to the practice of oral history, one of the most important means of preserving and celebrating the memory and history of individuals too often overlooked in the history books. Once considered a problematic, unreliable means of documenting the past, oral histories are now used extensively by those in the field of history. Moreover, scholars rely on oral history to give voice to those whose lives are not represented in conventional archives, including women, African Americans, rural dwellers, laborers, immigrants, colonized people, gays and lesbians, and other disadvantaged groups. The goal of the course is to help students in the preparation, execution, evaluation and interpretation of oral history interviews.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Grounds for Change, Humanities, Social Science, Transformational Service Learning

Prerequisites: ENG 102

HIST 280 - TOPICS IN HISTORY AND METHODOLOGY

Introduction to historiography and methodology of a specific topic; the nature of interpretation and various schools of thought on the topic. Experience in reading and interpreting primary sources, such as written documents, photographs, oral history, and quantitative data. Please click highlighted CRN for a more detailed description of this course.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

HIST 300 - THE ANCIENT WORLD

The classical societies of the ancient Mediterranean world; the Greek city states; the rise of Rome; and the nature and decline of the Roman Empire.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111

HIST 301 - HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH

This course will explore the ways in which changing scientific and philosophic definitions of health and disease have framed population health concerns, such as quarantine, occupational safety, maternal health, epidemiology, and fears of contagion, both real and imagined. By focusing on the intersection of health, politics, and ideas of gender, race, class, and ethnicity, this course will adopt a comparative approach and emphasize the relationship between social context and transformations in public health practice and policy in contexts ranging from ancient Rome to twentieth-century Chicago.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111 or HIST 112

Course Notes: or instructor's consent

HIST 302 - RENAISSANCE & REFORMATION

Society, economics, ideas, and politics in Western European from mid-13th century to 17th-century religious wars.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111

HIST 303 - IMMIGRATION, ETHNICITY, AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

Examination of changing trends in immigration, assimilation efforts, and immigration politics and policies.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 304 - 1960s AMERICA

This course looks in depth at the politics, foreign policy, and especially social movements that shaped the America during the decade and beyond. Politics will include an analysis of the Kennedy and Johnson Democratic administrations and the rise of Nixon and the Republicans in the late 1960s in relation to how ordinary Americans interpreted and shaped these politics. Foreign policy will include the Cuban Missile crisis, Vietnam War, and other Cold War entanglements. Protest movements will incorporate civil rights, anti-war, feminism, and Black Power movements. In looking at the history of this decade by theme and chronologically, students in this course will get an in-depth understanding on the actual history -- rather than popular memory that has developed since -- of a decade of fundamentally changed American identities and society.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107

HIST 305 - MODERN IMPERIALISM

The overseas expansion of Europe and the US in the 19th and early 20th centuries, including their conquest, administration, cultural and technological transformation, and economic exploitation of colonies. Anticolonial movement, wars of national liberation, and decolonization after World War II.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112

HIST 306 - THE WORLD SINCE 1945

Main currents in development of global institutions and values from 1945 to present.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 112 or HIST 122

HIST 307 - HISTORY OF CHICAGO

Growth of the city and suburbs; land use and economy; changing ethnic and social components; politics and culture.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 308 - WOMEN & THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION

This course will examine women's struggle to expand their public role and legal rights in Russia in the half century prior to the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917. Key topics include: women's participation in organized revolutionary movements; challenges to everyday meanings of gender, marriage, motherhood, and sexuality; and contributions to the eventual overthrow of the tsarist regime.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: HIST 112

HIST 310 - EUROPE FROM ABSOLUTISM - REVOLUTION

Absolutism and the Scientific Revolution; social and cultural trends; and the growth of European overseas empires.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112 or HIST 122

HIST 311 - SOCIETY AND CULTURE OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE

Social, cultural, and political institutions in Western Europe from later Roman Empire to mid-13th century.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111

HIST 312 - TOPICS: NEWBERRY SEMINAR

An intensive interdisciplinary six-credit seminar held at the Newberry Library with students from DePaul, Loyola, UIC and Roosevelt. Drawing on the Newberry’s vast archival and book collection and on recent and established scholarship, the course focuses on an annual topic selected by two professors. Enrollment is limited to five Roosevelt students chosen by Roosevelt's Newberry Library liaison. Course meets twice a week for three hour sessions.

Credits: 6

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 229

Course Notes: Click on red CRN for course description.

HIST 314 - POLITICS & CULTURE IN AMERICAN REVOLUTION

This course will introduce students to the major ideas and events in American history from 1763 to 1800 that spurred political, cultural, and social change. We will examine the political theories that inspired Revolutionary calls for independence and the government created in its aftermath. We will also, however, consider the Revolution and its aftermath from the perspective of ordinary people, including artisans, laborers, slaves, free blacks, and women.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106

HIST 315 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

This course analyzes the history of Latin America from pre-Hispanic times to the revolutions of Independence. Readings will focus on political, social and cultural historical processes, including the following topics: Amerindian societies, conquest, colonization, empire, the Atlantic World, frontiers, environmental changes, gender, race & ethnicity, slavery, administration and corruption.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111 or HIST 112

HIST 316 - LATIN AMERICA SINCE INDEPENDENCE

Socioeconomic structures, law and politics, ideologies, growth and distribution of power and resources, religious culture, reform and revolution from independence to present.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112 or POS 203

HIST 317 - THE FRENCH REVOLUTION & NAPOLEAN

Examination of the collapse of the Old Regime and the course of revolution; Napoleonic era; and impact of revolution on Europe and World.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112 or HIST 122

HIST 323 - URBAN VISION: CITIES AND SUBURBS

Cultural and social history of US cities from colonial small town to 21st-century megalopolis. Focus on environment, politics, immigration, race and ethnicity, work, family life, reform, mass culture, and suburbanization.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 325 - DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

Development of American foreign relations from American Revolution to the present. Topics include manifest destiny and expansionism; imperialism of the 1890s; US rise to global power in the 20th century; and the end of the Cold War. Emphasis on diplomacy in the war on terror and contemporary foreign policy. See Pos 325.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107 or POS 201

HIST 326 - TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY

Thematic topics in American social history, including courses focused on gender, race, region, and/or class. Please click highlighted CRN for a more detailed description of this course.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 327 - WORKING MEN & WORKING WOMEN

Development of labor organizations from 1840 to present and changing lifestyle of the laboring population.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 106

Course Notes: or advisor consent.

HIST 330 - COLONIAL & REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA

Evolution of American social, economic, and political institutions in the colonial and Revolutionary eras.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106

HIST 331 - CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY IN THE UNITED STATES

Major topics in American Constitutional development from colonial beginnings through the 20th century.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 333 - HISTORY & MEMORY OF THE CIVIL WAR

This course explores the history and political and cultural memory of the Civil War. Among the subjects to be examined include the commemoration of the dead, the place of slavery in the memory of the Civil War, disputes over the teaching of the Civil War, the role of the Confederate flag and the lost cause, changing perceptions of notable figures, and the experiences and reminisces of regular soldiers and citizens.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106

HIST 335 - HISTORY OF NATIONALISM

Examination of content and issues surrounding one of the most important currents of modern history; basic historical methodologies.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112

HIST 337 - HISTORY OF UNITED STATES REFORM MOVEMENTS

Analysis of reform movements, including abolitionism, populism, progressivism, New Deal, the 1960s, and recent reform movements.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Justice Studies, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 106

HIST 341 - TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY

Topics may include class formations and divisions, intellectual currents, nationalism, unification, and revolutionary upheavals. Please click the highlighted CRN for a more detailed description of this course.

Credits: 1-3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112 or HIST 122

HIST 342 - TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY

Asian, African, and Latin American studies; topics may include global linkages. Please click the highlighted CRN for a more detailed description of this course.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111 or HIST 112

HIST 347 - TUDOR/STUART ENGLAND

This course will explore the history of England from the accession of Henry VII in 1485 to the so-called “Glorious Revolution” at the end of the seventeenth century. In seeking to understand the emergence of the English nation, the clash between royal and parliamentary authority, and the relationship between gender and power, we will give particular attention to the vivid personalities of English rulers and the impact of their policies on religious, social, and political life throughout the British Isles. Assigned readings will focus on the intersections between religion, rebellion, and revolution in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the ways in which ordinary Englishmen and women experienced the dynastic crises and upheaval of the period that launched England from peripheral European state to one of the wealthiest and most powerful nations of the modern era.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 111 or HIST 112

HIST 348 - SOCIAL & CULTURAL HISTORY OF MEDICINE 1500-PRESENT

This course will explore the social and cultural history of medicine in urban settings from the fifteenth century to the present and the ways in which urban culture shaped the development of the modern medicine and its practitioners. This course assumes no special technical knowledge of the biomedical sciences.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112

HIST 350 - SEMINAR: HISTORY, MEMORY, CINEMA

The purpose of this course is to examine feature and documentary film as primary sources for the study of history and memory. Six main historical themes will be considered: war, protest and revolution, imperialism and national identity, auto/biography, everyday life, heroism. Students will study the key issues in film studies and the interaction between cinematic representations and written sources.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 280

HIST 352 - MAKING MODERN AMERICA 1880-1929

Populism, the Progressive Movement, immigration, rise of Jim Crow, nationalism, and emergence of the US as a world power.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107

HIST 353 - AMERICA TRANSFORMED: 1929-1945

The tumultuous years from the Great Depression through World War II; emphasis on social, political, and cultural history.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 354 - HISTORY & MEMORY OF WORLD WAR TWO IN THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE

This course considers the Second World War from the perspective of ordinary people, victims of oppression, resisters, collaborators, common soldiers as well as political and military leaders. It also examines the collective memory of the war--how it was and is remembered in Europe and the United States in film and popular culture. The course includes a two-week study abroad trip to Europe.

Credits: 6

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science, Travel Based Study

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 112

Course Notes: or instructor consent., Study abroad course w/travel to The, Netherlands, France Germany required;, additional charges apply., Trip will take place in second and third weeks of May., Students must meet with instructors submit application, to Justin Osadjan (josadjan@roosevelt.edu), before registering., The cost of the trip is approximately $2,800, in addition to normal tuition rates.

HIST 355 - UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR

Historiographical exploration and research of a select and significant topic.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 280

Course Notes: OR consent of instructor

HIST 357 - THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1945

Major issues that have shaped the US in recent decades emphasizing both domestic social and political history and foreign policy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107

HIST 364 - WHITE CITY & BLACK METROPOLIS

Chicago constructed the ?White City? to host the world during the 1893 Columbian Exposition. A half-century later, two prominent African American sociologists called the same city the ?Black Metropolis.? This course will interrogate the spaces between these metaphors across a century of Chicago history. Chronological topics will include: the birth of the city as ?Nature?s Metropolis?; the Chicago Fire; the Exposition; the Haymarket affair; the Great Migration and 1919 riot; ethnic neighborhood associations of the 1920s; Depression radicalism and unionism in the 1930s; the greater migration of the 1940s; housing crises during the 1950s and beyond; civil rights and Black Power; and the shift from the "plantation politics" of Richard J. Daley in the 1960s to the election of the anti-machine candidate Harold Washington in the 1980s. Students taking this course will read secondary materials and conduct primary source research in local archives to analyze and discuss the power and construction of racial identity to better understand the rich and complex urban history of Chicago.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

HIST 365 - BLACK CHICAGO HISTORY AND CULTURE 1770-1960

The role and impact of the African-American community on the culture, society, politics, and economy of the city of Chicago from DuSable to 1960.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 228 or HIST 229 or HIST 106

HIST 368 - SOCIETY AND CULTURE IN THE ANTEBELLUM ERA

Emergence and development of a new government under the Constitution of 1787. Political re-formation from the election of Andrew Jackson to the election of Lincoln; Jacksonian Democracy; importance of slave labor and wage labor as cores of the market economy; religious-based reform; countervailing influences of nationalism and sectionalism.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 228

HIST 371 - MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AFRICA

The rise of nationalism; end of colonialism; rise of neo-colonialism; Cold War influences; managing the problems of independence. See Afs 371.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 112 or HIST 122 or HIST 240

HIST 373 - SCANDINAVIAN WELFARE STATE & NATIONAL IDENTITY

This course will examine the history of the comprehensive social welfare state in Scandinavia and its impact on the construction of modern national identity beginning with the historical roots of the Scandinavian welfare state through its contemporary combination of market capitalism with a broad social net driven by a “society first” mentality in the public, corporate, and private sectors. A significant part of the course is a two-week study-trip to Sweden and Finland.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 107 or HIST 122

HIST 375 - SPECIAL TOPICS: FOOD IN HISTORY

Food, in all of its aspects, is the center of human economies, social organization and culture. As such, food is intimately related to politics. From the Nineteenth Century on the modern world grew more complex through technology, global trade, the growth of business, and science knowledge among others. As a result, Americans have been drawn into larger debates about these crucial subjects. Opinions on matters ranging from social and environmental issues, immigration policies, and politics, and history have always interested to the public and have found political expression. This course surveys these matters over time: food production and environmental concerns; food economics; food processing and science; food marketing; diets and fads; labor issues and immigration; and globalization.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 121 or HIST 107

HIST 383 - HISTORY & POLITICS OF WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES

Women in the US from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the women's rights movement and feminism, work, family, health, and education. Issues of class, race, ethnicity.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 107

HIST 384 - INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY

Internship with a local organization involving a significant history component. An internship requires working the equivalent of 8 hours/week (10 hours summer) for a total of at least 120 hours at the site of the selected organization. The student will keep a journal or log of weekly work and write a final paper that reflects upon the organization and its relationship to the history community or a particular historical subject related to his/her work. Offered in conjunction with faculty advisor, by faculty consent, and requires an advanced signed contract.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science, Transformational Service Learning

Course Notes: Consent from advisor.

HIST 391 - HISTORY OF MEXICO

Social, economic, political and cultural development of Mexican society from its pre-Hispanic roots through Spanish conquest; independence movements; the Revolution; evolution into modern Mexican society.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: HIST 111 or HIST 112

HIST 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent course requiring faculty consent.

Credits: 1-6

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science