PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

PHIL 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

Basic philosophical questions in metaphysics, theory of knowledge, political theory, ethics, and philosophy of religion. Representative answers to be found in writings of classical and contemporary philosophers.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 102 - PHILOSOPHIES OF LIFE

We will consider the shape and character of various human lives and examine concepts such as meaningfulness, completeness, unity, memory, the experience of time, awareness of mortality, and vividness of experience.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 103 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY

A survey of major philosophers and philosophical movements from the ancient world through the 19th century.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 130 - JUSTICE, LIBERTY, EQUALITY

This course covers contemporary problems and theoretical reflections drawn from ancient, modern and contemporary sources about justice, liberty and equality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 204 - PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The concepts of God, faith and reason, religious experience, the problem of evil, and religion and morality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Non-western Culture, Social Science

PHIL 206 - PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE

Philosophical problems found in selected novels, short stories, plays, poems, and essays.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 209 - CRITICAL THINKING

Practical training in informal analysis and evaluation of arguments encountered in everyday events.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 210 - LOGIC

Deductive and inductive logic; analysis of propositions and arguments and fallacies of reasoning.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Legal Studies, Social Science

PHIL 215 - WHAT IS A FAMILY?

This course offers a detailed examination of key texts in the humanities that have shaped Western thought on the family. Students read texts spanning ancient, early modern, late modern, and contemporary contexts, and analyze the diverse ways family is understood, enacted, and represented.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

PHIL 219 - WORLD RELIGIONS

A survey of the histories and beliefs of the major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Satisfies non-Western requirement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

PHIL 230 - ETHICS

Classical ethical systems such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Sophomore standing

PHIL 235 - LUCRETIUS: ON THE NATURE OF THINGS

We will study Lucretius’ famous scientific poem alongside supplementary selections from Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, and contemporary thinkers. The emphasis will be the philosophy of science and politics, and the history of philosophy. A long time ago, the scientific advancements of the Greek philosophers were brought to the Romans by an unknown but brilliant poet named Lucretius. Over the course of his short book, he explains and extols atomism—which we still use today to explain the hidden workings of nature—and explores the implications of this theory for matters of love, sex, politics, and death. Mysterious, beautiful, and full of ancient wisdom, his poem has recently been the object of interest in the American literary and scientific community, including a recent New York Times bestseller. Experience his poetry and reflect on his theories and what they mean for our time.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 240 - THE ENLIGHTENMENT

This course will examine philosophical and political texts, along with works of drama, music, and art from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These investigations will serve a larger mission of answering the dominant question of this unique period of history: What is Enlightenment?

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, International Studies, Social Science

PHIL 250 - ON HAPPINESS

A consideration of alternative conceptions of human fulfillment; among other themes, we will examine the relation of happiness to love, morality, and mortality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 280 - LIFE & DEATH IN MEDICINE

An examination of a variety of life and death issues in medicine, including how scarce, life-preserving resources should be allocated, the problems associated with allowing people in hospitals to die, and the ethics of transplantation.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 290 - TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

A detailed analysis of a major movement, problem, work, or future in modern or contemporary philosophy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 304 - FEMINISM & WESTERN PHILOSOPHY

This course will provide a close examination of selected canonical texts in Western philosophy and their subsequent feminist responses and revisions. We will explore how feminist philosophers have interpreted influential Western thinkers from the 17th century to the present, and how these interpretations have generated foundations for feminist inquiry, informing contemporary philosophical, feminist, and public discourse on topics including the self and autonomy; difference and sameness; reason and belief; public and private spheres; sexuality and identity; and gender, nation, and race. The reading list will include texts by Descartes, Locke, Marx, Emerson, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Said, and their feminist interpreters.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: WGS 110 or WGS 210

Course Notes: or instructor consent.

PHIL 324 - POLITICS & LITERATURE

A philosophical understanding of political life through the reading of literature. Topics may include oppression, tyranny, compromise, jealousy, friendship, equality, liberty, and justice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL or Literature.

PHIL 328 - PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

The special nature of historical thinking and historical knowledge; how historical knowledge differs from scientific knowledge; some of the seminal works in the philosophy of history, especially those of the 20th century.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL or HIST.

PHIL 329 - PHILOSOPHY OF LAW

Philosophic issues and theories concerning law, judicial process, justice, liberty, responsibility, and punishment.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Legal Studies, Social Science

Course Notes: 1-PHIL 1-POS course.

PHIL 330 - PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE

A philosophical examination of the fundamental differences between the natural world and the human world and between the world of necessity and the world of artifice.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in philosophy.

PHIL 331 - PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY

Social and ethical implications of new technology; problems in contemporary environmental ethics.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 3 SH of PHIL with a min grade of C required or consent, of instructor.

PHIL 333 - BUSINESS ETHICS

Relation of morality to business and professional practices; application of moral principles to cases in advertising, preferential hiring, worker safety, and environmental responsibility of corporations. See Mgmt 333.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 PHIL course or instr. consent

PHIL 334 - BIOMEDICAL ETHICS

Ethical issues involving mandatory genetic screening, cloning, abortion, the rights of patients and health care providers, disclosure about experimentation, and the funding of health care and health care research.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1-PHIL course or consent of instructor.

PHIL 341 - PHILOSOPHY OF FEMINISM

Philosophical feminism from Plato to the present; focus on women and morality, women and knowledge; the ways in which philosophical thought has helped women find their own voices.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

PHIL 343 - PHILOSOPHY & TYRANNY

A philosophical study of tyranny through the writings of Sophocles, Herodotus, Xenophon, Plato, Montesquieu, Marx and Hannah Arendt.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 350 - PHILOSOPHY IN FILM

Philosophy through the medium of film. Topics may include appearance and reality, justice, political myths, friendship, violence, the individual and the community, the meaning of life, and love and sex. Readings and film(s) for each topic.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL or Literature.

PHIL 355 - EXISTENTIALISM

We will explore issues of human freedom, commitment, vulnerability, and authenticity by reading authors such as Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Camus

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

Course Notes: 1 course in PHIL.

PHIL 360 - COSMOLOGY & CREATION

The implication of scientific theories of the origin and structure of the universe for religious ideas of divine creation. Emphasis on the modern period, especially contemporary big bang theory. See also Libs 360.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: UWR

PHIL 361 - METAPHYSICS ANCIENT AND MODERN

A study of ancient and modern philosophers on questions such as: Does God exist? What is the soul? What is being? What is the relationship of human beings to the cosmos?

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: Prerequisites: 3 hrs of PHIL w/min grade of C.

PHIL 365 - NIETZSCHE'S BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL

Nietzsche's critique of the modern world--exhilarating and filled with despair; daring yet somehow cautious; sophisticated and careful while transporting the reader to awe-inspiring heights--is typified by his book, Beyond Good and Evil, a work which prepares us for a new understanding of philosophy. After Nietzsche, nothing in philosophy is the same: morality, reality--all of it is powerfully and radically transformed.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 371 - HERODOTUS

This is a one book course on Herodotus's 'Histories' a work which is at the same time historical, literary, and philosophical. The themes of the 'Histories' are timely because they are timeless: freedom, slavery, tyranny, oppression, diversity, national character, the power of speech and the power of deed, and eros and its perversions.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 1 course in Philosophy required.

PHIL 372 - PLATO ON LOVE

This course is devoted to Plato’s dialogue, The Symposium, the subject of which is love.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 373 - MONTAIGNE'S ESSAYS

A study of Montaigne's "Essays," the first modern work to attempt to think through the whole of the human experience.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: 3 sh OF philosophy required.

PHIL 374 - UTOPIAS

Thomas More's "Utopia," which gave us the word “utopia” itself, enjoyed its 500th anniversary in 2016. This course reflects on whether the idea of a utopia still makes sense and, if so, what its use is.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 375 - ROUSSEAU'S DISCOURSE ON THE ORGIN OF INEQUALITY

This course is devoted to a single book: Jean-Jacques Rousseau?s Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality among Men. The core of this book contains an extended reflection on the tension between human nature and society, especially on the ways in which society both distorts and fulfills nature. Part of this reflection involves a consideration of what it means to be a social and political being, the coming to be of property, how conflict among human beings arises, and the genesis and moral status of inequality in human society. This is a course for those who want to think carefully and honestly about what it means to be human.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in Philosophy required.

PHIL 376 - MACHIAVELLI

A study of Machiavelli''s two seminal works--"The Prince " and "The Discourses on Livy"-- paying particular attention to his philosophical criticism of Chriendom.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

Course Notes: 3 hrs PHIL w/min grade of C.

PHIL 377 - ORIGINS OF THE WORLD

Through a study of the works of philosophers such as Machiavelli, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, and Rousseau, we shall try to consider the distinctive characteristics of the modern world.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

PHIL 380 - TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

Detailed analysis of a major movement, problem, work, or future in modern or contemporary philosophy.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in Philosophy or instr. consent

PHIL 384 - PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHOLOGY

An examination of fundamental psychological concepts (e.g., perception, consciousness, memory, shame, emotions and rationality) from a philosophical perspective.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Prerequisites: 3 Credit Hours of Philosophy

PHIL 385 - PHENOMENOLOGY

An exploration of the structure and fundamental phenomena of the human experience -- love and death; freedom and attachment; consciousness and sensation; memory and time -- through a study of the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and others.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Humanities, Social Science

Course Notes: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

PHIL 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Study of a particular philosopher, movement, or problem.

Credits: 1-4

Course Notes: Consent

PHIL 399 - SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT

A research project in the student's area of concentration done under the direction of the area advisor or another appropriate faculty member.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Sr.stand. consent