SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

SOC 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

Basic theories and concepts of sociology; culture; roles and norms; personality and group; forms of social organization; class, caste, and race; community; social institutions; collective behavior; social change.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 110 - INTRODUCTION TO POLICY STUDIES

This introductory course offers an understanding of common policy areas and the analytical tools needed to understand policy issues commonly discussed in the public arena. Readings center on on exploring definitions, media portrayals, and the politics of public policy. Class discussions will focus on exploring how public policy shapes the sociopolitical landscape and offers the legal framework for aspects of public/private life. Understanding policy is a broad endeavor, yet includes considerations of cultural norms, political power struggles and legal frameworks.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 210 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES

Contemporary issues from a sociological perspective. Topics may include institutional problems of modern societies and issues related to class, race, gender, sexuality, environmental destruction, and global inequality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above.

SOC 211 - CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES

Contemporary global issues from a sociological perspective. Topics many include institutional problems of non western societies and issues related to class, race, gender, sexuality, disability, environmental destruction, and inequality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Fulfills SOC 210 requirement. Sophomore standing.

SOC 212 - CONTEMPORARY URBAN ISSUES

Contemporary urban issues from a sociological perspective. Analysis of urban problems; global impact on cities; spatial structuring of race, class, gender, and inequality.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Course Notes: or 3 hours of social science.

SOC 214 - SUMMER IN THE CITY

Students in this class will explore the city of Chicago. We will examine a wide array of dimensions that compose the city: downtown development, urban sustainability and green development, segregation, ethnic enclaves, gentrification, public housing, public transportation, public schools, community organizations and tourist spectacles. Each topic will be paired with a site visit or field trip – where the class will go to a specific place in Chicago that best exemplifies the topic under examination and discuss what we see. Students should take away an in-depth understanding of the social forces that shape everyday life in Chicago as well as an intimate understanding of the city as a lived experience.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 215 - THE FAMILY

Development of families; variations in family patterns in various cultures; role relationships within families; family influences in personality development; mate selection; parent-child relations; family disorganization and reorganization.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 216 - POVERTY, INEQUALITY, & PUBLIC HEALTH

Despite the world’s highest per capita expenditure for health care, the U.S. public health care system, which includes all organized pubic and private measures to prevent disease and illness, to promote health, and to prolong life, remains under-resourced. This class explores the main functions of the public health care system and uses a social epidemiological and structural lens to analyze the intersections between poverty, inequality, and disease and illness. Core themes will vary by semester but may include: disparities of access, availability, accountability, acceptability, and affordability of health care services; effects of socio-demographics and social location (e.g., class, race, gender, age, disability, geography); consequences of industrial food production and techno-food consumption; acute and chronic diseases and disabilities associated with environmental and workplace causation; infant and maternal mortality and morbidity; and violence in communities and society.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: ENG 102

Course Notes: Service hours in the community required for this course., Options include:direct service or indirect service/advocacy, work.

SOC 221 - HEALTH & SOCIETY

This course examines ideas about health and disease in cultural context, including challenging the Western view that medicine is "culture free." Other topics include: differences among disease, illness,and sickness; the politics of food; the mind-body divide (or lack thereof); the influence of class, gender, race, and other socioculturalfactors on health and disease, within cultures and throughout history; culture-specific creation of health and medical syncretism; population-specific health issues; and using social science knowledge to solve contemporary and emerging health problems.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 222 - AMERICAN IMMIGRATION & HEALTH

Discourse on American immigration is dominated by economic cause and effect and the persistent myth of the US as a cultural melting pot. For many groups, however, the immigration experience results in insults to individual and group identity, often with profound consequences for physiological, mental, and social health. In this course, we will explore the history of health and US immigration through topics such as biological racialization and health status as a criterion for exclusion of immigrants; we will also explore contemporary immigration stories with a focus on health and the embodied experience. Topics will include the health consequences of dismantled family and kin networks, the culturally specific nature of mental health and its implications for immigrant participation in American society, the medicalization of cultural matters, immigration and the socioeconomic gradient, and the implications of culturally different explanatory models for delivery of healthcare and shaping healthcare policies.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 223 - SPORTS AND SOCIETY

Sociological perspective on the socio-cultural characteristics of sport. Examination of the cultural, historical, economic, political, and structural factors (e.g., race, class, gender) that form salient aspects of today's sport activities at various levels. Focus on the characteristics of sports and how they reflect and impact the social climate of society. (3)

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

SOC 224 - THE SOCIOLOGY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIETY

This course explores the experience of African Americans in America from slavery to the present. Attention is given to how Black Americans have coped through enslavement, legel segregation, civil rights, affirmative action, and the post-civil rights era. Also, interpersonal dynamics within the Black community are examined in relation to such issues as class, gender, and skin tone. The course offers a better understanding of how the lives of Black Americans are affected every day by the American social structure.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture, Social Science

SOC 225 - MCDONALDIZATION OF SOCIETY

George Ritzer's McDonaldization thesis holds that the world is increasingly organized around principles of efficiency, calculability, predictability, and control through nonhuman technology. Although in many ways a restatement of Max Weber's classic analysis of bureaucracy, Ritzer's thesis has been extended in very original ways by others into the analysis of chain stores, restaurants, theme parks, sex work, the operation of police, courts and prisons, and universities. This course will be focused on the McDondaldization thesis, its extensions and its critics.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 230 - SOCIAL DEVIANCE

Review of traditional and critical theories of crime and deviance. Perspective examined include functionalism, social disorganization, anomie, differential association, labeling, and critical theory.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 232 - URBAN YOUTH IN A CULTURE OF VIOLENCE

This course centers insights from cultural sociology to examine the causes and consequences of violence among youth in urban settings. We will seek to understand how youth interpret their material and ideal environments so that we may approach prevention and intervention strategies by meeting youth "where they are", rather than imposing solutions that might not take into account how young people make sense of themselves and the social world. We will focus on some key works in urban ethnography. And we will conduct research on local violence prevention and intervention organizations and programs to assess how cultural sociology can be useful to their work.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 241 - CROSS-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Concepts of cultural anthropology in contemporary non-Western cultures and US; development as it affects traditional ways of life. Economic activities, gender, race, health, kinship and marriage, and trends in anthropological fieldwork. See Anth 240.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

SOC 260 - SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL

This course explores the relationship between society and the individual self, particularly how in the ebb and flow of everyday life, we both consciously and unconsciously, make and remake both social structures and ourselves through social interaction. Our goal is to gain a better understanding of when we are acting as social agents, conscious of our motives and ability to create social change, and when social structures are acting upon us via socialization, social expectation, norms, sanctions, stereotypes, etc. to reinforce the existing social order. Topics include social perception; social influence and persuasion; institutionalized classism, racism, sexism, ageism, and ableism; intimacy and close relationships, emotions and emotion management; and pro-social behavior.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Course Notes: Sophomore standing.

SOC 290 - THE RESEARCH PROCESS

Data-gathering techniques in the social sciences; questionnaires, interviews, participant observation, and the use of official statistics. Basic statistical procedures used to analyze and interpret data; the use of computers in research; emphasis on the preparation and writing of research reports.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: 1 course in the social sciences.

SOC 291 - SOCIAL STATISTICS: INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY & STATISTICS

Elementary probability and probability distributions, random variables, expectation, and variance; binomial and normal probability distributions. Applications to estimation, confidence intervals, statistical testing of hypotheses, two-sample techniques. Correlation and least squares.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: MATH 116 or MATH 121 or MATH 110 or Compass-Algebra with min score of 45

Course Notes: Math courses higher than 121 satisfy the prerequisite.

SOC 303 - THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Development of classical perspectives within sociology. Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 9 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: 9 semester hours in SOC or instr. consent

SOC 304 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORIES

Main schools and tendencies of 20th-century sociology. Topics may include the Chicago School, symbolic interactionism, functionalism, conflict theory, exchange theory, phenomenological sociology, ethnomethodology, and critical theory.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: 6 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: 6 semester hours in SOC or instr. consent

SOC 307 - CITIES AT WAR

This course provides study abroad opportunity in order to explore themes such as urbanization and the increasing lethality and indiscriminate nature of war. This course will also cover the extent to which globalization and global war have irrevovably affected the development of the modern city as we know it in Chicago and all modern cities. 200701

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 308 - QUALITATIVE METHODS

In depth introduction to forms of qualitative research. Focus on field research, interviews, oral histories, and participant observation. Additional focus on content analysis and internet research.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 310 - WOMEN, WORK & THE FAMILY

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: or instr. consent

SOC 311 - CULTURE & POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA

Intersections of culture and politics with focus on indigenous peoples in Latin America. How culture and ethnic identity are shaped by political factors; how "indians" were incorporated and marginalized by colonial and national processes; impact of global forces such as the cocaine trade on national politics and indigenous culture; mobilization of indigenous identity in social movements. See Anth 311.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Hispanic Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 or SOC 241

Course Notes: Required prereq or 6 sem hrs in SOC.

SOC 314 - GLOBALIZATION, SOCIETY, & CULTURE

Social, economic, political, and cultural systems that span nation-state borders. Current status of nationalism, nation-states, and the global economy; how cultural identities and communities are formed within the context of global systems. Topics may include effects of world markets on economies and societies, transnational migration and social movements, indigenous groups' self-representation through global technologies such as video and the Internet, hybrid identities and "bifocal" cultural frameworks. See Anth/Pos 314. (3)

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 or SOC 241 and 9 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: 9 semester hours in SOC or instructor consent

SOC 315 - WORK AND ORGANIZATIONS

Classical and contemporary perspectives on the importance of work and organizations in social life. Changing forms of organization, new technologies, and their impacts upon quality of work life.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 317 - RACE & THE CITY

Course examines how urban space takes on racialized meanings, how race serves as an organizing principle within cities, and the relationship between race, place, and power. Topics include: politics of Chicago neighborhoods, race in a post-civil rights era, functions of housing markets and other institutions in protecting privilege and power. Finally, using race as an analytical tool, we explore how the city is experienced and imagined differently when using race as our lens.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

SOC 318 - SOCIAL CHANGE

Since the 1970s a new form of 'neoliberal' capitalism has emerged. Neoliberalism rode in on attacks against 'big government' and 'special interests', accompanied by promises of economic growth and greater efficiency. In practice, neoliberalism has failed to deliver on these promises. Everywhere it has been implemented, neoliberalism has produced mounting inequality and increasing insecurity for the vast majority. Rather than reducing the size of government, neoliberalism has shifted the weight of government from social programs benefitting poor and working people to massive subsidies for the wealthy, the military-industrial complex, and the prison-industrial complex. This course examines the rise of neoliberalism, its contradictions, and its current crisis. In response to the constant refrain that 'there is no alternative', the course also explores alternatives to neoliberalism in the form of economic democracy and worker self-managed enterprises.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above.

SOC 319 - LATINO URBAN EXPERIENCE

This course focuses on the contemporary urban experience of Latinos, particularly the contributions they make to U.S. society and the challenges they face. Topics include the impact of globalization on immigration and labor markets, gentrification of Latino neighborhoods, the rise of the Latino middle-class, and immigration policy, etc.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Hispanic Studies, International Studies, Non-western Culture, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 320 - THE SOCIOLOGY OF INEQUALITY

Nature and function of social inequality. Selected theories of inequality; American stratification system; comparative inequality; indicators of social class position; class consciousness and identification; prestige and power; class position and its correlates; processes of social mobility.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 321 - EDUCATION AND GENDER

Course explores multiple and complex relationships of gender and education, in both the US and in Third World communities. Topics include; feminist theory and pedagogies; historical perspectives on educating women; controversies and contested theories about gender and education; systems of representation that serve both to emancipate and subordinate women; stratification in schools; and ways to empower ourselves and our students through education.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 322 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

The institution of religion in American life. Major historical incidents; currently popular religions; how religion interacts with other elements in the society.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 323 - GENDER IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

Cultural variations in gender ideologies and roles. How diverse cultures define differences between the sexes and their relative positions in social structures. See Anth 323.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 or SOC 241

SOC 324 - BLACK & WHITE RACIAL IDENTITY

Racial identity in the constuction of one's sense of self, belonging, and intergroup relations; interdisciplinary approach to understanding the nature of "blackness" and "whiteness"; how identities structure relationships with others and ourselves.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Plus 3 hours of SOC or instructor's consent.

SOC 325 - EDUCATION AND SOCIETY

Social factors involved in educational processes within US society. The interaction of educational institutions with various cultural, economic, and social factors.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 326 - RACE, GENDER & THE MASS MEDIA

Relationship between U.S. media and social construction of race and gender; media's role in perpetuating/challenging gender and racial stereotypes; perceptions and reaction to representations; critical consumption of media images/messages pertaining to disenfranchised groups.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture, Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 327 - RACE & ETHNIC RELATIONS

Race and ethnicity in the US; history and present status of various racial and ethnic groups; political economy of race; changing public discourse of race and racial identities.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Non-western Culture, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

SOC 329 - WHITENESS IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY

Course addresses the history, economics, politics and social construction of whiteness. Specific focus on three white deep-settler countries (countries that whites colonized, controlled, and stayed for generations): U.S., Australia and South Africa. These three countries share many similarities and by examining the differences we can develop a sophisticated understanding of the (re)production of white privilege, white power and the continuation of white supremacy world-wide.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science, Travel Based Study

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above.

SOC 330 - SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ILLNESS

Mental disorders as major social problems; concept of mental illness in popular understanding, psychiatry, and social sciences; cultural, social-psychological, and sociological theories of development of mental disorders; empirical studies of cultural variation and social variables in mental disorders; social aspects of patient career; social prevention of mental disorders.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 331 - CRIMINOLOGY

Social processes and criminal behavior; theories of crime; social factors and causes of crime; law enforcement and the judicial process; corrections; prevention of crime.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above.

SOC 337 - URBAN GENTRIFICATION

The political, economic, and cultural forces that are remaking working-class residential neighborhoods and commercial areas into places for higher-income newcomers from the professional middle class.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 245

SOC 339 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEATH, DYING & LOSS

This interdisciplinary course interrogates the social, cultural, psychological, medical, ethical, philosophical, and spiritual issues that surround and possibly give meaning to the experiences of dying, death, loss, mourning, and living on after the death of significant people in our lives. Visual materials and methods (film, websites, videography, and photography) are combined with traditional materials methods of analysis (reading, class discussion, and class reports) to explore various themes including: the death system; societal responses to death, including those that are untimely, violent or preventable; end-of-life illnesses including Alzheimer’s, dementia, heart disease, and cancer; caring for the dying and the filial crisis; burial and memorializing rituals; assisted death, right-to-die, euthanasia, and the social causes and impact of ending one’s own life by suicide; and the ideas of immortality and transcendence.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 340 - GENDER AND SOCIETY

The social construction of gender definitions; focus on how gender roles in the family, media, and work place are constructed.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: Plus 3 hours of SOC or instructor consent; Available for, graduate credit.

SOC 341 - GLOBAL CHICAGO

Course explores the various forces shaping Chicago in the era of globalization and what this entails for the built environment, social policy and people's everyday experience of the city. Central themes include: changes in urban economic development and labor markets, global city building, urban development and gentrification, public and affordable housing policies, new strategies of policing and surveillance, Green practices and environmental policy, immigration, and challenges confronting the education system.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Plus 3 hours of SOC or consent of instructor.

SOC 342 - GLOBAL RACE

Course centers on the origins, discourse and outcomes of racialization processes on a global level. Students learn the specific processes of racialization by researching at least one non-North American country. Racialization will be understood at the intersection of gender, sexuality, citizenship, class and religion. Course has five sections: theorizing race; origins of racializing humanity (from egyptian elavery to the Enlightenment); modern theories of race (from Eugenics to racial formation theory); colonization and slavery (development of racialized capitalism); and Europeans and the development of whiteness.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 343 - GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

Course examines the myriad of root causes of gender-based violence, nationally and internationally. Topics include the gendered nature of violence in US social institutions such as education, the economy, and the health care system, and in Third World contexts including cultural traditions and war. This course also focuses on the social constructions of masculinity and how far from being solely a "women's issue," it will examine how violence that targets women and girls threatens the healthy development of all human beings.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 344 - SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION

Course explores the ways in which global economic, political and cultural forms operating at local, national, regional and global levels are transforming social life. Course examines: changing role of the nation-state, restructuring of global labor markets, economic development, media/cultural forms, and immigration and transnational identities. Course also focuses on social actors involved in shaping globalization including corporations, transnational political and financial organizations, non-governmental organizations and grassroots social justice movements. Study of actors resisting neoliberalism and top-down, while suggesting an alternative conception of globalization grounded in indigenous, gender, labor and environmental social justice, with a special focus on Latin America.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 346 - COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

Examination of community organizing theories and approaches. Focuses on cases studies and hands on experience.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or 3 Credit Hours of Soc. Sciences

Course Notes: or instructor consent. 3 SH in social science.

SOC 350 - SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

Theory and method in the sociology of culture; topics may include high culture and popular culture, modernism and postmodernism, the politics of mass media, and the role of religion in contemporary societies.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 351 - PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

This course will examine the growth of mass incarceration in the United States since 1980. The factors behind the rapid growth of the prison system, such as the War on Drugs, will be examined, along with the role of powerful private sector interests that are heavily invested in the growth of the prison system.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 353 - SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH, ILLNESS, & MEDICINE

Comparative perspective on the organization and delivery of health care; topics include the meaning of illness; social epidemiology and disease causation; mortality and morbidity; incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic illnesses and diseases; medicalization of everyday life events and illnesses; alternatives to allopathic & Western medicine; medical education and the transformation of medicine into a profession with unparalleled power and authority; and health disparities associated with class, race, gender, age and disabilities.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 354 - GENDER, POWER, & THE BODY

Interrogates the social and cultural significance of the body and the relationship of embodiment to self-identity, empowerment, and oppression. Materialist, social constructionist, and post-modernist critiques of social and political efforts to discipline the body, as well as resistance to these efforts are explored. Core themes will vary by semester but may include: intimate partner violence, reproductive liberty, biopolitics, sexuality, postcolonial feminism, otherness, and feminist epistemology.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 355 - URBAN INEQUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

The ways in which cities are produced not only structure the built environment, but they also shape opportunity and access to resources. With this conceptualization of urbanization as our starting point, this class will focus on housing as a key urban form expressing social power relations. Topics include, but are not limited to: gentrification, homelessness and social disorder politics, senior citizen housing, the housing needs of single mothers, urban education and the rise of charter schools, and policing and surveillance of neighborhoods.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

SOC 356 - SOCIAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE

This course offers students the unprecedented opportunity to explore ideas about justice with a variety of scholars and activists. Students will investigate contemporary issues of social justice in both theory and practice. The course is a participatory, discussion-based class that will entail active involvement.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: 9 Credit Hours of Humanities or 9 Credit Hours of Soc. Sciences

Course Notes: 9 sh in humanities or social science or consent of, instructor.

SOC 357 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

Exploration of a social justice issues(s) from a sociological perspective. Course content varies but recent topics have included: Restorative Justice and Urban Inequality and Social Justice. Click red highlighted number on course schedule for description details.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

SOC 360 - THE BODY

This seminar interrogates the social and cultural significance of the body and the relationship of embodiment to self-identity, empowerment, and oppression. Materialist, social constructionist, and post-modernist critiques of social, political, medical, and religious efforts to discipline the body, as well as resistance to these efforts are explored. Core themes will vary by semester but may include: patriarchy, power, difference, heteronormativity, gendered and racialized identities, contraception, abortion, infertility, kinship and relatedness, assisted, and third party reproduction, reproductive justice, medical evangelism, intimate partner violence, sexualities, postcolonial feminism, and feminist epistemology.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science, Women Gender Studies

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: Sophomore standing or above.

SOC 361 - IMMIGRATION PATTERNS & POLICIES

Course provides insight into current debates about immigration, by situating contemporary migratory processes within broader historic and political economic contexts. Focus is on how immigration patterns, policies that aim to control immigration, and discourses about immigrants relate to economic demands, notions of nation and citizenship, and social organization and cultural values prevalent among migrants and in U.S. society. Course materials will focus on Mexico-U.S. migration, though other cases will also be considered.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: Plus 3 hours of Soc or consent of instructor.

SOC 367 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Central analytical problems in the study of social movements; dynamics and significance of social movements in contemporary US politics and society.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Justice Studies, Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 9 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: with a minimum grad of a C.

SOC 381 - SPECIAL TOPIC

Topics vary by semester and faculty's expertise. Click the red CRN for more information.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 3 Credit Hours of Sociology

Course Notes: 3 sh in Sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 389 - SEMINAR: SELECT TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

SOC 390 - THESIS

By arrangement with faculty.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Course Notes: By arrangement with faculty.

SOC 394 - INTERNSHIP

Internship with a local organization involving sociological study. An internship requires working the equivalent of 8 hours/week (10 hours summer) for a total of at least 120 hours at the site of the selected organization. Students will meet the internship requirements of the department (e.g., journal, final paper). Offered in conjunction with faculty advisor, by faculty consent, and requires an advanced signed contract.

Credits: 3

Attributes: Social Science

Course Notes: Consent from Sociology Faculty.

SOC 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Topics should not be part of regular curriculum. Student should demonstrate significant interest in and preparation for topic selected.

Credits: 1-4

Attributes: Social Science

Course Notes: or instructor consent

SOC 397 - URBAN POLICY ISSUES

Theoretical approach to urban issues. Local communities and community organizations; crime and delinquency; segregation; and poverty.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: or instructor consent