Pre-Health Professional Curricula

Offered in: Chicago | Schaumburg

Preparation for admission to professional schools is provided at both the Chicago and Schaumburg campuses in the following programs: pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, pre-physician assistant, pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-optometry, pre-podiatry and pre-veterinary.

Pre-professional health is not considered a major, minor or concentration. Therefore, students wishing to fulfill the requirements for preparation for professional school in addition to those for a BA or BS degree should declare their pre-professional status as early as possible, using the form found here.

This information will make it easier for your academic advisors to provide you with the guidance you need in preparing for the course requirements, standardized tests and application processes involved in successfully entering these careers. The pre-professional designation will not appear on your official transcript, but it will appear on your advising records.

In addition to completing the pre-professional designation form, pre-professional students should see a pre-professional advisor at Roosevelt University as soon as possible. Some professional schools, such as pharmacy, admit students who have not received an undergraduate degree. In these cases, it is sometimes possible to attain a bachelor’s degree upon completion of three years (90 SH) of work at Roosevelt University and one year in a professional school, provided the appropriate courses are chosen. The pre-professional advisor will help students plan their programs to meet the requirements for both degrees in the shortest time possible.

Preparation for admission to professional schools is provided at both the Chicago and Schaumburg campuses in the following programs: pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, pre-physician assistant, pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-optometry, pre-podiatry and pre-veterinary.

Pre-professional health is not considered a major, minor or concentration. Therefore, students wishing to fulfill the requirements for preparation for professional school in addition to those for a BA or BS degree should declare their pre-professional status as early as possible, using the pre-Professional form on the Registrar's website.

Pre-Chiropractic Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to chiropractic schools are quite similar, although each chiropractic school sets its own requirements. The pre-chiropractic curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most chiropractic schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to chiropractic schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY (highly recommended)3
BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab, highly recommended)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab, highly recommended)4
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)5
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)5
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)5
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
SOC 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3
SPCH 101PUBLIC SPEAKING (highly recommended)3
Total Credit Hours59

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into chiropractic school, the pre-chiropractic curriculum through must be completed by the first semester of senior year of college. There currently is no standard admissions test for chiropractic school admission. As noted above, the pre-chiropractic curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You may decide to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Chiropractic careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Dentistry Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to dentistry schools are quite similar, although each dentistry school sets its own requirements. The pre-dental curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most dental schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to dental schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY (highly recommended)3
BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab)4
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab, highly recommended)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 231CALCULUS I5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY (highly recommended)3
Total Credit Hours62

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into dental school, the pre-dental curriculum through Organic Chemistry must be completed by the end of the junior year of college. The Dental Admission Test Program (DAT) requires the completion of one year of biology, one year of general chemistry and one year of organic chemistry. The physics and advanced biology are necessary for entrance into dental school, but will not be tested on the DAT. The typical four-year curriculum for a pre-dental student mirrors the curriculum of a premedical student. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. As noted above, the pre-dental curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You may decide to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Dental careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Medicine Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to medical schools are quite similar, although each medical school sets its own requirements. Medical schools require applicants to have completed the pre-medical curriculum prior to application. The premedical curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most medical schools in the United States. The courses required for admission to medical schools, with few exceptions, include the courses below.

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY3
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab, highly recommended)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
MATH 231CALCULUS I (highly recommended)5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
SOC 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3
Total Credit Hours60

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into medical school, the pre-medical curriculum must be completed by the end of the junior year of college. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) requires the completion of one year of biology, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of physics, one course each in psychology and sociology. One course in biochemistry is highly recommended before completing the MCAT.

These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. The pre-medical curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You should strive to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences. Students interested in medicine careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences.

Pre-Occupational Therapy Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to occupational therapy schools are quite diverse, although there are some common core pre-requisites for occupational therapy schools. As a result, it is extremely important to check the course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning. The general courses required for admission to occupational therapy schools include the following:

Core
ALH 119INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY2
BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab)4
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 201ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 254CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE3
PSYC 339ADULT DEVELOPMENT3
SOC 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3
PSYC 200INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS3
or MATH 217 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
Total Credit Hours28

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into occupational therapy school, the pre-occupational therapy curriculum through must be completed by the first semester of senior year of college. The standard admission test for occupational therapy is the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). There are no pre-requisites to take the GRE, however, typically students take this exam in the summer after their junior year. As noted above, the pre-occupational therapy curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. Some schools require additional course work in chemistry and physics.

Students interested in Occupational Therapy careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Optometry Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to optometry schools are quite similar, although each optometry school sets its own requirements. The pre-optometry curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most optometry schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to optometry schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY (highly recommended)3
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 351GENERAL GENETICS (with lab, highly recommended)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
MATH 231CALCULUS I5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
PHYS 233CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS I DISCUSSION1
PHYS 234CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS II DISCUSSION1
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
SPCH 101PUBLIC SPEAKING (highly recommended)3
Total Credit Hours67

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into optometry school, the pre-optometry curriculum must be completed by the end of the junior year of college. The Optometry Admission Test Program (OAT) requires the completion of one year of biology, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of physics and one semester of calculus. The typical four-year curriculum for a pre-optometry student mirrors the curriculum of a pre-medical student. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. As noted above, the pre-optometry curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You may decide to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Optometry careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Pharmacy Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to pharmacy schools are quite similar, although each pharmacy school sets its own requirements. The pre-pharmacy curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most pharmacy schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to pharmacy schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY3
BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab)4
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
MATH 231CALCULUS I5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I4
SPCH 101PUBLIC SPEAKING3
ECON 101PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3
or ECON 102 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II
Total Credit Hours64

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into pharmacy school, the pre-pharmacy curriculum through Organic Chemistry must be completed by the end of the junior year of college. The Pharmacy College Admission Test Program (PCAT) requires the completion of one year of biology, one year of general chemistry and one year of organic chemistry. The physics and advanced biology are necessary for entrance into pharmacy school, but will not be tested on the PCAT. The typical four-year curriculum for a pre-pharmacy student mirrors the curriculum of a premedical student. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. As noted above, the pre-pharmacy curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You may decide to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Pharmacy careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Physical Therapy Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to physical therapy schools are quite similar, although each school sets its own requirements. The pre-physical therapy curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most physical therapy schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to physical therapy schools include the following:

BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab)4
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
MATH 231CALCULUS I5
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 201ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY3
Total Credit Hours52

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into physical therapy school, the pre-physical therapy curriculum must be completed by the end of the first semester of senior year of college. The standard admission test for occupational therapy is the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). There are no pre-requisites to take the GRE, however, typically students take this exam in the summer after their junior year. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. As noted above, the pre-physical therapy curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You may decide to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Physical Therapy careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Physician Assistant Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to physician assistant schools are quite similar, although each school sets its own requirements. The pre- physician assistant curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most physician assistant schools in the United States. The general courses required for admission to physician assistant schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY3
BIOL 123ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (with lab)4
BIOL 124ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (with lab)4
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
Total Credit Hours48

Pre-Podiatry Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to podiatry schools are quite similar, although each podiatry school sets its own requirements. Podiatry schools require applicants to have completed the pre-medical curriculum prior to application. The pre-podiatry curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most podiatry schools in the United States. The courses required for admission to podiatry schools, with few exceptions, include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY (highly recommended)3
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
MATH 217ELEMENTARY STATISTICS3
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
PSYC 103INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY3
SOC 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3
Total Credit Hours50

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into podiatry school, the pre-podiatry curriculum must be completed by the end of the junior year of college. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) requires the completion of one year of biology, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of physics, one course each in psychology and sociology. One course in biochemistry is highly recommended before completing the MCAT. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. The pre-podiatry curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You should strive to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Podiatry careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Curriculum

Requirements

Courses required for admission to veterinary schools are quite similar, although each veterinary school sets its own requirements. Veterinary schools require applicants to have completed the pre- veterinary curriculum prior to application. The pre-veterinary curriculum at Roosevelt University meets the entrance requirements for most veterinary schools in the United States. The courses required for admission to medical schools include the following:

BCHM 355BIOCHEMISTRY (highly recommended)3
BIOL 201ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 202ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND GENETICS (with lab)4
BIOL 301CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (with lab)5
BIOL 360MICROBIOLOGY (with lab, highly recommended)5
CHEM 201GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 202GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
CHEM 211ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (with lab)4
CHEM 212ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (with lab)4
PHYS 201INTRODUCTION TO NON-CALCULUS BASED PHYSICS I (with lab)4
PHYS 202INTRO TO NON-CALCULUS PHYSICS II (with lab)4
Total Credit Hours46

For the student who expects to complete a degree in four years and go directly into veterinary school, the pre- veterinary curriculum must be completed by must be completed by the end of the first semester of senior year of college. The standard admission test for occupational therapy is the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). There are no pre-requisites to take the GRE, however, typically students take this exam in the summer after their junior year. These courses serve as a common denominator between applicants and are also the foundation upon which students build once in a professional school. The pre-veterinary curriculum given above should be considered the minimum science preparation for a health professions school. You should strive to take additional upper division biology and chemistry courses to strengthen your background in the sciences, especially if you elect a major in the humanities or social sciences.

Students interested in Veterinary Medicine careers should seek early guidance from an advisor in the Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences. Check the science course recommendations of the schools to which you are applying to assist in your course planning.