SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

SOC 401 - FOUNDATIONS IN SOCIOLOGY

Course designed primarily for first year graduate students. Introduction of sociological theories, and debates. Students are introduced to aspects of graduate and professional careers and members of the graduate faculty and their reserch and interests.

Credits: 3

SOC 402 - URBAN STUDIES SEMINAR

Contemporary urban problems, including police, housing, racial discrimination, fiscal crisis, employment, and public services in the metropolis. Analysis of leading central city problems and critique of leading academic theories.

Credits: 3

SOC 403 - DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Development of classical perspectives within sociology. Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.

Credits: 3

SOC 404 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORIES

Main schools and tendencies of 20th-century sociology. Topics may include the Chicago School, symbolic interactionism, functionalism, conflict theory, exchange theory, phenomenological sociology, ethnomethodology, and critical theory.

Credits: 3

SOC 405 - QUANTITATIVE METHODS

Fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis; computer applications that support the presentation and analysis of quantitative data.

Credits: 3

SOC 406 - SEMINAR IN SOCIAL THEORY

Advanced seminar covering issues of current interest in social theory. Topics vary by semester and by instructor.

Credits: 3

SOC 408 - QUALITATIVE METHODS

In depth introduction to forms of qualitative research. Focus on field research, interviews, oral histories, and participant observation. Additional focus on content analysis and internet research.

Credits: 3

SOC 409 - SPECIAL TOPIC GRADUATE SEMINAR

Special topics course in sociology. Topic vary based on expertise of faculty member.

Credits: 3

SOC 411 - CULTURE & POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA

Investigation of social, cultural, and political patterns and processes; focus on indigenous peoples in national and global contexts. Topics may include how "Indians" were incorporated in nationalist projects, indigenous uses of coca and problems posed by the cocaine trade, commodification of native crafts, and indigenous rights and social movements. (3)

Credits: 3

SOC 414 - GLOBALIZATION, SOCIETY, & CULTURE

Social, economic, political, and cultural systems that span nation-state borders. Current status of nationalism, nation-states, and the global economy; how cultural identities and communities are formed within the context of global systems. Topics may include effects of world markets on economies and societies, transnational migration and social movements, indigenous groups' self-representation through global technologies such as video and the Internet, hybrid identities and "bifocal" cultural frameworks. See Anth/Pos 414. (3)

Credits: 3

Course Notes: or six hrs. in social science.

SOC 417 - RACE & THE CITY

Course examines how urban space takes on racialized meanings, how race serves as an organizing principle within cities, and the relationship between race, place, and power. Topics include: politics of Chicago neighborhoods, race in a post-civil rights era, functions of housing markets and other institutions in protecting privilege and power. Finally, using race as an analytical tool, we explore how the city is experienced and imagined differently when using race as our lens.

Credits: 3

SOC 418 - SOCIAL CHANGE

Since the 1970s a new form of 'neoliberal' capitalism has emerged. Neoliberalism rode in on attacks against 'big government' and 'special interests', accompanied by promises of economic growth and greater efficiency. In practice, neoliberalism has failed to deliver on these promises. Everywhere it has been implemented, neoliberalism has produced mounting inequality and increasing insecurity for the vast majority. Rather than reducing the size of government, neoliberalism has shifted the weight of government from social programs benefitting poor and working people to massive subsidies for the wealthy, the military-industrial complex, and the prison-industrial complex. This course examines the rise of neoliberalism, its contradictions, and its current crisis. In response to the constant refrain that 'there is no alternative', the course also explores alternatives to neoliberalism in the form of economic democracy and worker self-managed enterprises.

Credits: 3

SOC 419 - LATINO URBAN EXPERIENCE

This course focuses on the contemporary urban experience of Latinos, particularly the contributions they make to U.S. society and the challenges they face. Topics include the impact of globalization on immigration and labor markets, gentrification of Latino neighborhoods, the rise of the Latino middle class, and immigration policy, etc.

Credits: 3

SOC 420 - THE SOCIOLOGY OF INEQUALITY

Nature and function of social inequality. Selected theories of inequality; American stratification system; comparative inequality; indicators of social class position; class consciousness and identification; prestige and power; class position and its correlates; processes of social mobility.

Credits: 3

SOC 421 - EDUCATION AND GENDER

Course explores multiple and complex relationships of gender and education, in both the US and in Third World communities. Topics include; feminist theory and pedagogies; historical perspectives on educating women; controversies and contested theories about gender and education; systems of representation that serve both to emancipate and subordinate women; stratification in schools; and ways to empower ourselves and our students through education.

Credits: 3

SOC 422 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

The institution of religion in American life. Major historical incidents; currently popular religions; how religion interacts with other elements in society.

Credits: 3

SOC 424 - BLACK & WHITE RACIAL IDENTITY

Racial identity in the construction of one's sense of self, belonging, and intergroup relations; interdisciplinary approach to understanding the nature of "blackness" and "whiteness"; how identities structure relationships with others and ourselves.

Credits: 3

SOC 425 - EDUCATION AND SOCIETY

Social factors involved in educational processes within US society. The interaction of educational institutions with various cultural, economic, and social factors.

Credits: 3

SOC 426 - RACE, GENDER & THE MASS MEDIA

Relationship between U.S. media and social construction of race and gender; media's role in perpetuating/challenging gender and racial stereotypes; perceptions and reaction to representations; critical consumption of media images/messages pertaining to disenfranchised groups.

Credits: 3

SOC 427 - RACE & ETHNIC RELATIONS

Race and ethnicity in the US; history and present status of various racial and ethnic groups; political economy of race; changing public discourse of race and racial identities.

Credits: 3

SOC 428 - EDUCATION AND GENDER

Course explores multiple and complex relationships of gender and education, in both the US and in Third World communities. Topics include; feminist theory and pedagogies; historical perspectives on educating women; controversies and contested theories about gender and education; systems of representation that serve both to emancipate and subordinate women; stratification in schools; and ways to empower ourselves and our students through education.

Credits: 3

SOC 429 - WHITENESS IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY

Course addresses the history, economics, politics and social construction of whiteness. Specific focus on three white deep-settler countries (countries that whites colonized, controlled, and stayed for generations): U.S., Australia and South Africa. These three countries share many similarities and by examining the differences we can develop a sophisticated understanding of the (re)production of white privilege, white power and the continuation of white supremacy world-wide.

Credits: 3

Attributes: International Studies, Social Science, Travel Based Study

SOC 430 - SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH/ILLNESS

Mental disorders as major social problems; concept of mental illness in popular understanding, psychiatry, and social sciences; cultural, social-psychological, and sociological theories of development of mental disorders; empirical studies of cultural variation and social variables in mental disorders; social aspects of patient career; social prevention of mental disorders.

Credits: 3

SOC 431 - CRIMINOLOGY

Social processes and criminal behavior; theories of crime; social factors and causes of crime; law enforcement and the judicial process; corrections; prevention of crime.

Credits: 3

SOC 432 - SEMINAR IN EVALUATION RESEARCH

Techniques of evaluation research applied to analysis of particular social programs. Discussion of steps in evaluation research process, data-gathering techniques, and methods of analysis and interpretation.

Credits: 3

SOC 434 - SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL DISORDERS

Mental disorders as major social problems; concept of mental illness in popular understanding, psychiatry, and social sciences; cultural, social-psychological, and sociological theories of development of mental disorders; empirical studies of cultural variation and social variables in mental disorders; social aspects of patient career; social prevention of mental disorders.

Credits: 3

SOC 435 - SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH

Mental disorders as major social problems; concept of mental illness in popular understanding, psychiatry and social sciences; cultural, social-psychological and sociological theories development of mental disorders; empirical studies of cultural variation and social variables mental disorders; social aspects of patient career; social prevention of mental disorders.

Credits: 3

SOC 440 - GENDER AND SOCIETY

The social construction of gender definitions; focus on how gender roles in the family, media, and work place are constructed.

Credits: 3

SOC 441 - GLOBAL CHICAGO

Course explores the various forces shaping Chicago in the era of globalization and what this entails for the built environment, social policy and people's everyday experience of the city. Central themes include: changes in urban economic development and labor markets, global city building, urban development and gentrification, public and affordable housing policies, new strategies of policing and surveillance, Green practices and environmental policy, immigration, and challenges confronting the education system.

Credits: 3

SOC 442 - GLOBAL RACE

Course centers on the origins, discourse and outcomes of racialization processes on a global level. Students learn the specific processes of racialization by researching at least one non-North American country. Racialization will be understood at the intersection of gender, sexuality, citizenship, class and religion. Course has five sections: theorizing race; origins of racializing humanity (from egyptian elavery to the Enlightenment); modern theories of race (from Eugenics to racial formation theory); colonization and slavery (development of racialized capitalism); and Europeans and the development of whiteness.

Credits: 3

SOC 443 - GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

Course examines the myriad of root causes of gender-based violence, nationally and internationally. Topics include the gendered nature of violence in US social institutions such as education, the economy, and the health care system, and in "Third World" contexts including cultural traditions and war. This course also focuses on the social constructions of masculinity and how far from being solely a "women's issue", it will examine how violence that targets women and girls threatens the healthy development of all human beings.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: SOC 101

Course Notes: SOC 340 recommended.

SOC 444 - SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION

Course explores the ways in which global economic, political and cultural forms operating at local, national, regional and global levels are transforming social life. Course examines: changing role of the nation-state, restructuring of global labor markets, economic development, media/cultural forms, and immigration and transnational identities. Course also focuses on social actors involved in shaping globalization including corporations, transnational political and financial organizations, non-governmental organizations and grassroots social justice movements. Study of actors resisting neoliberalism and top-down, while suggesting an alternative conception of globalization grounded in indigenous, gender, labor and environmental social justice, with a special focus on Latin America.

Credits: 3

SOC 446 - COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

Examination of community organizing theories and approaches. Focuses on cases studies and hands on experience.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: 3 SH in social science.

SOC 450 - SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

Theory and method in the sociology of culture; topics may include high culture and popular culture, modernism and postmodernism, the politics of mass media, and the role of religion in contemporary societies.

Credits: 3

SOC 451 - PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

This course will examine the growth of mass incarceration in the United States since 1980. The factors behind the rapid growth of the prison system, such as the War on Drugs, will be examined, along with the role of powerful private sector interests that are heavily invested in the growth of the prison system.

Credits: 3

SOC 453 - SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH, ILLNESS, & MEDICINE

Comparative perspective on the organization and delivery of health care; topics include the meaning of illness; social epidemiology and disease causation; mortality and morbidity; incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic illnesses and diseases; medicalization of everyday life events and illnesses; alternatives to allopathic & Western medicine; medical education and the transformation of medicine into a profession with unparalleled power and authority; and health disparities associated with class, race, gender, age and disabilities.

Credits: 3

SOC 454 - GENDER, POWER, & THE BODY

Interrogates the social and cultural significance of the body and the relationship of embodiment to self-identity, empowerment, and oppression. Materialist, social constructionist, and post-modernist critiques of social and political efforts to discipline the body, as well as resistance to these efforts are explored. Core themes will vary by semester but may include: intimate partner violence, reproductive liberty, biopolitics, sexuality, postcolonial feminism, otherness, and feminist epistemology.

Credits: 3

SOC 455 - URBAN INEQUALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE

The ways in which cities are produced not only structure the built environment, but they also shape opportunity and access to resources. With this conceptualization of urbanization as our starting point, this class will focus on housing as a key urban form expressing social power relations. Topics include, but are not limited to: gentrification, homelessness and social disorder politics, senior citizen housing, the housing needs of single mothers, urban education and the rise of charter schools, and policing and surveillance of neighborhoods.

Credits: 3

SOC 456 - SOCIAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE

This course offers students the unprecedented opportunity to explore ideas about justice with a variety of scholars and activists. Students will investigate contemporary issues of social justice in both theory and practice. The course is a participatory, discussion-based class that will entail active involvement.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: or instructor consent.

SOC 457 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

Exploration of a social justice issues(s) from a sociological perspective. Course content varies but recent topics have included: Restorative Justice and Urban Inequality and Social Justice. Click on red highlighted number on Course Schedule for specific descriptions.

Credits: 3

SOC 460 - THE BODY

This seminar interrogates the social and cultural significance of the body and the relationship of embodiment to self-identity, empowerment, and oppression. Materialist, social constructionist, and post-modernist critiques of social, political, medical, and religious efforts to discipline the body, as well as resistance to these efforts are explored. Core themes will vary by semester but may include: patriarchy, power, difference, heteronormativity, gendered and racialized identities, contraception, abortion, infertility, kinship and relatedness, assisted, and third party reproduction, reproductive justice, medical evangelism, intimate partner violence, sexualities, postcolonial feminism, and feminist epistemology.

Credits: 3

SOC 461 - IMMIGRATION PATTERNS & POLICY

Course provides insight into current debates about immigration, by situating contemporary migratory processes within broader historic and political economic contexts. Focus is on how immigration patterns, policies that aim to control immigration, and discourses about immigrants relate to economic demands, notions of nation and citizenship, and social organization and cultural values prevalent among migrants and in U.S. society. Course materials will focus on Mexico-U.S. migration, though other cases will also be considered.

Credits: 3

SOC 467 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Central analytical problems in the study of social movements; dynamics and significance of social movements in contemporary US politics and society.

Credits: 3

SOC 471 - APPR TO PROGRAM EVALUATION

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the conceptual frameworks, vocabulary and methods of program evaluation, enabling students to become better evaluators and consumers of evaluation research and reports. This course is one of the four courses required for the Certificate in Program Evaluation (CiPE). The CiPE certificate is designed to provide individuals with marketable skills in conducting and interpreting program evaluations.

Credits: 3

SOC 472 - QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS OF PROGRAM EVALUATION

Part of the Sociology Department's Certificate in Program Evaluation. The use of statistics tends to intimidate many people, however, possessing an understanding of basic statistics is critical to interpreting and using social science and evaluation research. This course is designed as an introductory survey of basic statistical tools, including: (1) variables, (2) measures of central tendency, (3) variance, (4) t-test, (5) chi-square, (6) ANOVA, (7) correlations, and (8) simple regression. This course is designed for students that possess little or no background in statistics. The primary goal of this course is to develop students' basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics that are utilized in evaluation research. While students may not become expert in these statistical methods after just one course, they will become informed consumers of statistical data. Students will also understand the basics of statistical discourse and gain an understanding of both SPSS and Excel that will be used in running statistical tests.

Credits: 3

SOC 473 - QUALITATIVE ASPECTS OF PROGRAM EVALUATION

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of qualitative inquiry and it use in applied research settings. The principle focus of the course will be in using qualitative inquiry methods in the evaluation of programs; however, qualitative inquiry as research will also be covered.

Credits: 3

SOC 474 - PRACTICUM IN PROGRAM EVALUATION

The practicum in program evaluation is made up of two parts. The first part is devoted to the art and science of grant writing. The ability to produce grants that can be used to support your evaluation work is essential. The second part of the practicum provides students with hands on experience to apply skills learned in the classroom by working with Roosevelt University faculty. Roosevelt faculty has been involved in a range of large and small scale evaluations.

Credits: 3

SOC 480 - SEMINAR: RESEARCH METHODS

Theoretical concepts and methodology applied to various social phenomena. Presentation and critique of student-designed research projects.

Credits: 3

SOC 481 - SPECIAL TOPIC

Course content varies. All topics will relate to sociology, Prereq varies; specific prerequisite will be listed in the class schedule.

Credits: 3

SOC 482 - SPECIAL TOPIC

Course content varies. All topics will relate to sociology, Prereq varies; specific prerequisite will be listed in the class schedule.

Credits: 3

SOC 486 - APPLIED SOCIAL STATISTICS

This course introduces the basic concepts of statistics and statistical methods and their usefulness in a wide variety of real-world applications. Emphasis is placed on formulating questions of interest, choosing appropriate statistical techniques, verifying the assumptions behind the techniques, drawing proper conclusions from the analysis, and communicating results. Students will be introduced to a statistical software package (e.g., SPSS, SAS/STAT or a similar data management and analysis package), which will be used to manipulate small data sets.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: SOC 480

SOC 490 - THESIS

Credits: 1-6

SOC 490Y - MASTERS THESIS COMPLETION

BY ARRANGEMENT WITH FACULTY.

Credits: 0

Course Notes: BY ARRANGEMENT WITH FACULTY.

SOC 491 - EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH AND LEARNING

Completion of creation, participation, and analysis of an emancipatory research or experiential project focused around or relevant to a contemporary sociological issue, question, or debate. Project may develop as either an activist research or experiential learning project (internship, study abroad, or service learning). Subject area broad to provide students with the opportunity to select a topic, issue, or debate that engages their interests and emboldens them to make or contribute to social change.

Credits: 6

SOC 491Y - EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH & LEARNING COMPLETION

Completion of creation, participation, and analysis of an emancipatory research or experiential project focused around or relevant to a contemporary sociological issue, question, or debate. Project may develop as either an activist research or experiential learning project (internship, study abroad, or service learning). Subject area broad to provide students with the opportunity to select a topic, issue, or debate that engages their interests and emboldens them to make or contribute to social change.

Credits: 0

Prerequisites: SOC 491

SOC 492 - RESEARCH AND WRITING PROJECT

Completion of a substantial research project required for the degree. Requires ability to conceptualize and conduct independent and advanced research, analysis, and writing. Project may involve analysis of contemporary social issue, debate, or field of study. Topic to be developed by student in consultation with fulltime faculty committee or program advisor.

Credits: 3

SOC 494 - INTERNSHIP

Internship with a local organization involving sociological study. An internship requires working the equivalent of 8 hours/week (10 hours summer) for a total of at least 120 hours at the site of the selected organization. Students will meet the internship requirements of the department (e.g., journal, final paper). Offered in conjunction with faculty advisor, by faculty consent, and requires an advanced signed contract.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Consent from Sociology Faculty.

SOC 495 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Pursuit of individually selected topics. Topic may not be part of regular curriculum; student must demonstrate significant interest and preparation for study.

Credits: 1-6

Course Notes: Instructor Consent

SOC 497 - ADVANCED URBAN POLICY ISSUES

Theoretical approach to urban issues. Specific discussion of local communities and community organizations, crime and delinquency, segregation and poverty.

Credits: 3

SOC 498 - TEACHING APPRENTICESHIP

The Teaching Apprenticeship is designed to give students interested in teaching an opportunity to understand sociology pedagogy and gain practical experience in an undergraduate sociology course. Students will work closely with a faculty mentor in one of the faculty's undergraduate courses to gain insight into the teaching process. Students are expected to participate in a range of activities specific to course preparation and instruction including (but not limited to): attend classes, deliver lectures or lead discussion sessions, create and assess evaluation activities, prepare a syllabus, and write a statement of teaching philosophy based on sociology pedagogy readings.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Completion of 18 credit hours and good standing, in the MA Program., Course arranged with Faculty Member.