ENGLISH (ENG)

ENG 402 - TOPICS IN LITERARY AND CRITICAL THEORY

What does it mean to read a text? How do the perspectives we bring to reading shape and limit our understanding? This course will focus on one primary text and a wide range of theoretical materials; through intensive study and discussion, students will develop the tools necessary for graduate study in English, and will leave the course with a better sense of the critical and methodological frameworks they might bring to their future work in the discipline.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Required for the Grad credential in Teaching Writing.

ENG 404 - FEMINIST THEORIES

Credits: 3

ENG 410 - 17TH CENTURY BRITISH GENDER DEBATES

Credits: 3

ENG 411 - MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 412 - BRITISH ROMANTICISM

Credits: 3

ENG 413 - CRIME & VICTORIAN LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 414 - THE RISE OF THE NOVEL

Credits: 3

ENG 415 - TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE

Advanced literature seminars that focus on a period or topic in British literature. Recent topics have included "Non-Shakespearean Early Modern British Drama," "Crime and Victorian Literature," "The Rise of the English Novel." For more details, please click the highlighted CRN number for this course on the specific term schedule.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad standing.

ENG 416 - MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 418 - MASS MEDIA 1700-1900

You might think of "mass media" as a 20th-century phenomenon connected to the advent of radio, tv, or the internet -- but in fact mass media has a history dating back several hundred years, and in this class we'll explore its origins and its early years. Our time-travel takes us to Britain's eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a period of unprecedented and lightning-quick changes in who wrote, who read, and how information and ideas were transmitted. We'll begin by reading some theory and some history about the roles of writer, reader, and media in this period; with this context in mind, we'll spend most of our time discussing the new forms and genres that sprang up to accommodate the emergent cultural demand for information, education, and entertainment. Texts to be studied range widely and will include early periodicals, political writings, lectures, public art, and reviews along with more familiar literary texts like poetry (e.g., Byron's Don Juan), fiction (e.g., Dickens' David Copperfield), the essay (e.g., Swift's Battle of the Books), drama (e.g., John Gay's Beggar's Opera), and autobiography (Margaret Oliphant's Autobiography).

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing

ENG 419 - STAGING WITCHCRAFT PLAYS

Witchcraft Plays begins with one of the best known and most widely influential stage portrayals of witchcraft in theater history, Macbeth, which uses the figure of the witch to explode ideological assumptions about class (patriarchy, class-based social stratification, upward mobility) and gender (social, political and domestic roles). In this course, we will examine both fantastic portrayals of the witch, including Shakespeare's Macbeth, John Martson's Sophonisba, and Thomas Middleton's The Witch in conjunction with 'realistic' portrayals of witchcraft in British and Scottish court depositions as well as the stage representations of those cases in Thomas Dekker, John Ford and William Rowley's The Witch of Edmonton and Heywood and Brome's The Witches of Lancashire. We will consider witchcraft's dual valence in early modern England as both a means of vilifying women and as a means by which women could exercise autonomy and empowerment.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. Standing.

ENG 421 - NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 422 - RECENT AMERICAN FICTION

Credits: 3

ENG 423 - 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN'S FICTION

Credits: 3

ENG 424 - 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN'S FICTION

Credits: 3

ENG 425 - AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1945

Credits: 3

ENG 426 - TOPICS: MARKETING THE NATION

Credits: 3

ENG 427 - SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 428 - 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN'S LITERATURE

Credits: 3

ENG 429 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Advance literature seminars that focus on a period or topic in American literature. Recent topics have included "Early American Narrative Fiction," "American Renaissance," "American Realism," "American Gothic," "American Road Novels and Film," "Literature of Chicago" For more details, please click the highlighted CRN number for this course on the specific term schedule.

Credits: 3

ENG 430 - POST COLONIAL BRITISH LITERATURE

Anglophone literature of all genres from Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia in the aftermath of the British Empire. Literary response to cultural and linguistic colonization; analysis of national identity, cultural hybridity, and post-colonial subjectivity, and redefinitions of race and gender.

Credits: 3

ENG 435 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING

This seminar will consider what exactly the term “realism” signifies in the twenty-first century. To do so, we’ll look to realism’s opposite, texts that, in some way(s) or other(s), diverge from our notion of psychological, literary fiction. In so doing, we’ll consider the potential aesthetic, moral, political, existential, and physical effects of non-mimetic literary art. Our reading list will include novels by Tom McCarthy, Jesse Ball, and Ursula Leguin, along with short fiction by Bruno Schulz, Amelia Gray, Brian Evenson, among others.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: MFA standing required.

ENG 440 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. Standing

ENG 441 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing

ENG 442 - IMAGINING TERROR

This course examines twentieth and twenty first-century literary and cinematic representations of terrorism in the works of Anglophone writers.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 443 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. Standing. Taught in English.

ENG 444 - ADVANCED STUDIES THEME/MOVEMENT

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 445 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 446 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 447 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY THEME

Detailed study of literary texts linked by theme or motif. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: The Age of Satire; Gay and Lesbian Literature; The Beat Generation.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 448 - CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE

In 1986, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel House Made of Dawn. That moment is often understood as the start of the Native American Renaissance, a period characterized by a broad interest in American Indian peoples and cultures and increased publication of writing by Native writers. This seminar begins with that period, and we will study Native American fiction, poetry, prose, and film produced since 1970. Exploring works shaped by a strong sense of place, ritual, history, and many times, humor, we will pay particular attention to themes including the power of language and the imagination, self-determination (both personal and communal), and Native authenticity, resistance, and continuance.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: ENG 220 with a min grade of C-.

ENG 449 - READING & WRITING ECO-LIT

What is America’s history and present of ecological writing? This multicultural study of U.S. eco-literary traditions and trends includes both canonical and emerging authors. The range of topics includes various perspectives on: “going green,” global climate change, nature-writing, and environmental justice. Students read and apply ecocritical theory and author their own ecoliterature. Works from most, if not all, of the following authors will be required reading: Henry David Thoreau, Alice Walker, Enrique Salmon, Rachel Carson, Joseph Bruchac, Patti Ann Rogers, Leslie Marmon Silko, David Mas Masamoto, Mary Oliver, Aldo Leopold, César Chávez, and Janisse Ray.

Credits: 3

ENG 450 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 451 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 452 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 453 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 454 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 455 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 456 - ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE

Detailed historical and/or theoretical study of a literary genre. Readings include primary texts and critical/theoretical materials, with attention to literary analysis and research. Topics vary from semester to semester; examples of recent topics include: Modern American Poetry; U.S. Women and Comedy; Restoration Drama.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing.

ENG 457 - SATIRE: ORIGINS & DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3

ENG 460 - STUDIES IN A SINGLE AUTHOR

Advanced literature seminars that look closely at the work and career of a single author in relationships to cultural history or other relevant touchstones. Recent topics include “The Fiction of Mark Twain,” “Shakespeare and Film,” “Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Stein.” For more details, please click the highlighted CRN number for this course on the specific term schedule.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing

ENG 461 - STUDIES IN SINGLE AUTHOR

Credits: 3

ENG 462 - MARK TWAIN

Intensive study of selected works focusing on a specific theme.

Credits: 3

ENG 463 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN A SINGLE AUTHOR

Advanced literature seminars that look closely at the work and career of a single author in relationships to cultural history or other relevant touchstones. Recent topics include "The Fiction of Mark Twain," "Shakespeare and Film," "Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Stein." For more details, please click the highlighted CRN number for this course on the specific term schedule.

Credits: 3

ENG 464 - STUDIES IN SINGLE AUTHOR

Credits: 3

ENG 465 - LITERARY THEORY & CRITICISM

Critical methods of significant literary theorists, ancient and modern. Writing assignments involve hands-on application of theories to specific literary texts. Required of all English MA students; should be taken during first year of enrollment.

Credits: 3

ENG 466 - ADVANCED STUDIES CRITICAL THEORY

Intensive study of one or two schools of critical theory (post-structuralism, post-colonialism, Marxism, feminism, theories of ethnicity, cultural studies) and their implications for study in language, literature, and representation. Primary readings in theoretical texts with consideration of their implications for practice.

Credits: 3

ENG 467 - TEACHING WRITING: THEORY & PRACTICE

This course explores the theory and practice of writing instruction in secondary and post-secondary educational settings, with a special emphasis on the political implications of the choices that teachers make in the writing classroom. Students will explore pedagogies, interview writing teachers, develop assignments, and conduct independent research toward the creation of a personal teaching philosophy.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Counts toward Credential in Teaching of Writing.

ENG 468 - TOPIC: LANGUAGE, RHETORIC, & WRITING

Detailed study of a current or historical issue in language, rhetoric or writing. Subjects vary by semester but may include the study of a particular rhetorical tradition and practice, social justice and the teaching of writing, or the politics of literacy, for example. Students will explore theoretical underpinnings, pedagogical approaches, and specific types of academic and professional writing.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Grad. standing. Counts toward Credential in, Teaching Writing.

ENG 484 - INTERNSHIPS IN THE COMMUNITY

Student uses writing or teaching skills as an apprentice outside the University. Placements may include local arts organizations, book and journal publishers, not-for-profit organizations, corporations, museums, or youth and senior centers. Student receives on-site supervision and instruction and also works closely with a faculty advisor.

Credits: 3

ENG 485 - INTERNSHIP IN TEACHING LITERATURE

Student is apprenticed to an experienced teacher in an English literature course and participates in class planning and procedures. Construction of syllabus, lesson plans, lectures, writing assignments, and tests supplemented by classroom experience in facilitating discussions and supervising student progress.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Program approval

ENG 486 - INTERNSHIP IN TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING

Student is apprenticed to an experienced teacher in Introduction to Creative Writing and participates in most aspects of class planning and procedure. Construction of syllabus, lesson plans, lectures, and writing assignments as well as experience in leading critique of student writing and discussion of works by established authors. Pedagogical philosophies governing the teaching of creativity in the college classroom and at the primary and secondary levels.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Program approval

ENG 487 - INTERNSHIP IN TEACHING COMPOSITION

Student is apprenticed to an experienced teacher in a composition course and participates in class planning and procedure. Readings in composition theory supplemented by classroom observation and tutoring under supervision of director of composition.

Credits: 3

Course Notes: Program approval

ENG 490 - THESIS

Credits: 3-6

ENG 495 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Intensive study and original scholarship culminating in a written project. Topic to be developed by student in consultation with appropriate faculty member.

Credits: 1-6