Sociology, Applied, MA

Offered in: Chicago

The MA in Applied Sociology emphasizes the application of sociological knowledge, social theory, and research methods aimed at the development of policies and programs working toward social justice and change. Course work focuses on a range of practical and marketable skills in qualitative research methods, applied social statistics, evaluation methods, as well as writing for a public sociology audience. Students gain competence in the foundations of sociological theory and knowledge of race and class inequalities in relation to the faculty's core strengths of urban sociology, mass incarceration, community health, urban education, health disparities, and youth advocacy.

Because Roosevelt is situated in the heart of downtown Chicago, students will have unique opportunities to work in the actual communities impacted by the social forces they study in the class. Students in the program are strongly encouraged to pursue service-learning and internship opportunities with non-profit community organizations, public service agencies, urban schools and after school programs, and activist groups to gain practical experience working for social change and policy implementation. Students will also have opportunities to work with the Department's three research centers: the Policy Research Collaborative, Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation, and the St. Clair Drake Center for African and African-American Studies.

Completion of this degree normally requires two years as a full-time student, taking nine credit hours per semester. The program also provides part-time students a path toward completing the degree in a time frame that is compatible with their busy schedules.

The MA in Applied Sociology prepares our graduates for careers in the public sector, non-profit organizations, academia, and the private sector. Applied Sociology provides a strong foundation for students seeking careers in social service agencies, non-profits, public policy analysis, community organizations, health care management, labor unions, and criminal justice work, as well as fields in the corporate world including advertising, marketing, public relations, and market research analysis. Many of our graduates have remained in academia as college instructors at community colleges around Chicago or have continued advanced studies in PhD programs.

Admission

The coursework for the MA is Applied Sociology is based at Roosevelt University's Chicago campus. These are the guidelines for admission to the program:

  1. Applicants with an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher are admitted based upon previous academic performance.
  2. Applicants submit a one-two page admission essay explaining the applicant's desire to pursue graduate work in Sociology.
  3. Applicants also should have completed four undergraduate Sociology classes with a GPA of 3.25 of higher.

Important: Applicants not meeting the above requirements will be considered for admission if they submit a detailed work history, record of community activism, and letters of reference or with the approval of the graduate advisor. In certain instances, applicants may be admitted on a probationary basis with special restrictions.

Requirements

To earn the MA in Applied Sociology, students must complete 36 credit hours of course work.  This can be accomplished through Track 1 or Track 2 (see elaboration below).  For students in both tracks, five core courses are required.  Each must be taken the first time it is offered after the student has been admitted to the program. 

Coursework must be completed with a GPA of 3.0 or higher and include an thesis, or experiential research and learning project or a research & writing paper. Students must consult with the graduate advisor before deciding on an option.

Up to six semester hours of transfer credit may be counted upon approval by the Sociology faculty, providing these credits are in compliance with University requirements. With approval from the Sociology faculty, up to six semester hours in related disciplines may be included.

Track 1 - Thesis or Experiential Research and Learning Option

Students electing the SOC 490 Thesis or SOC 491 Experiential Research and Learning option must have a GPA of 3.5 after 27 credit hours.  

Students selecting this option complete the requirements below and choose between writing a research-based thesis or an experiential research and learning project (e.g., service learning project, study abroad, etc.). In both cases, students must submit a written proposal, including a proposed bibliography, list of research questions, and methodology statement or description of experiential research and learning project. Both the proposal and the completed thesis or project must be approved by a committee of two faculty members. The chair of the committee must hold full-time appointment in Sociology.

Students must complete an oral examination or defense of their work in SOC 490 THESIS or SOC 491 EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH AND LEARNING. Upon completion of written work, students schedule an oral defense with faculty committee (faculty chair and second reader). A final grade for this project will not be submitted until the student presents an oral defense of work. The oral defense must be completed in a timely fashion to meet university deadlines for graduation.

Core Requirements
SOC 401FOUNDATIONS IN SOCIOLOGY3
SOC 406SEMINAR IN SOCIAL THEORY3
SOC 408QUALITATIVE METHODS3
SOC 480SEMINAR: RESEARCH METHODS3
SOC 486APPLIED SOCIAL STATISTICS3
Select one of the following writing courses:6
THESIS
EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH AND LEARNING
Five electives approved by graduate advisor15
Total Credit Hours36

Track 2 - Research and Writing Option

Students in this track will complete the requirements below including SOC 492 RESEARCH AND WRITING PROJECT. This paper is designed to allow students to conduct a critical and in-depth analysis on a particular sociological issue (problem), a specific area of sociology (e.g., race, gender, housing, health disparities, social stratification, deviance), or a critical review of the literature surrounding a contemporary sociological debate. Students must submit a written MA paper proposal, including a proposed bibliography. Both the proposal and the completed project must be approved by a committee of two faculty members. The chair of the committee must hold full-time appointment in Sociology.

Core Requirements
SOC 401FOUNDATIONS IN SOCIOLOGY3
SOC 406SEMINAR IN SOCIAL THEORY3
SOC 408QUALITATIVE METHODS3
SOC 480SEMINAR: RESEARCH METHODS3
SOC 486APPLIED SOCIAL STATISTICS3
SOC 492RESEARCH AND WRITING PROJECT3
Six electives approved by graduate advisor18
Total Credit Hours36