Economics, MA

Offered in: Chicago

The graduate curriculum of the Economics Department is closely aligned with the mission of the university to educate socially conscious citizens and leaders. Economics as taught at Roosevelt includes the study of income distribution, globalization, caring labor, wages and working conditions, equity, social justice, and democratic economic planning, all of which are an integral part of developing a consciousness of social justice, economic abundance, and individual liberty appropriate to the twenty-first century.

Economics at Roosevelt University goes beyond the conventional economics that is taught at most universities in the United States and presents students with economic analysis from the perspective of alternative schools of thought. Roosevelt is one of the few universities in the United States where students can study economics from Heterodox points of view, in addition to mainstream Neoclassical and Keynesian points of view.

Pluralism, heterodoxy, intellectual tolerance and diversity of thought and method form the context for the goals of the Economics Department. We do not seek to replace one orthodoxy with another but rather to encourage our students to view economics as an evolving discipline that can help them make sense of the world around them. We seek to provide a series of lenses and analytical skills with which they can critically examine political, social and economic issues, weigh evidence, ask questions, develop their intellectual curiosity and appreciate diversity of thought.

Master's degree students from Roosevelt typically pursue careers in research, teaching, government service, non-profit organizations, labor unions, community organizing, and business.

Admission

Applicants for admission to graduate work in Economics must meet the general requirements for admission to graduate work in the University. Students must have completed an undergraduate degree, not necessarily in economics, to undertake graduate-level work. ECON 403 ECONOMICS FOR DECISION MAKERS is usually required, before beginning the graduate program, for those students with insufficient preparation in economics. Credit for ECON 403 ECONOMICS FOR DECISION MAKERS does not count toward the MA degree in Economics.

Internships

Economist internships at local government offices, social service agencies, non-profit organizations, and for-profit businesses are available, for credit, to assist students in career choice and development. Chicago is a dynamic city and major world center of finance, business, government, social activism, and philanthropy. Our internship program provides students with opportunities in all these areas.

Standards

Any graduate student who earns more than two C's, including grades of C+, C and C-, will be dropped from the program. Students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or better to receive an M.A. degree.

Advising

All graduate students must formulate their programs with approval of the graduate advisor. When students are planning their programs they should be aware that many courses are taught in only one semester of the academic year and plan accordingly. For information on the timing of courses for the coming year, consult the economics advisor.

Requirements

Students typically earn an MA in Economics by successfully completing 36 credit hours of course work (12 courses) at the 400 level. ECON 421 MACROECONOMIC THEORY and ECON 423 MICROECONOMIC THEORY must be taken within the first year of graduate study and passed with grades of B or higher. Any electives taken outside of economics must be taken at the 400 level and be approved in advance by the economics advisor. Students may petition the graduate advisor to have up to two courses completed with a grade of B or higher and taken elsewhere transferred for credit. Graduate credit is not given for ECON 403 ECONOMICS FOR DECISION MAKERS. Students with strong preparation in economics may be able to enroll directly in ECON 465 ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY and/or skip ECON 436 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS and enroll directly in ECON 446 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS, subject to approval by the economics advisor. Students who place out of these courses must still complete 36 credit hours.

Thesis Option

In rare cases and subject to the approval of the faculty, students may choose to write a thesis in lieu of two courses, an elective and an advanced theory course. In order to be approved for the thesis option, students must present a five-page prospectus to a full-time member of the department and gain consent in writing from that professor that she or he will serve as chair of the thesis committee.

Students should be aware that writing a thesis is a time-consuming and rigorous process and involves far more work than the two courses that are waived. The rewards can be enormous, but so is the workload, so think carefully before exercising this option. Like students pursuing the non-thesis option, thesis students must complete ECON 421 MACROECONOMIC THEORY and ECON 423 MICROECONOMIC THEORY within the first year of graduate study with grades of B or higher. Any electives taken outside of economics must be taken at the 400 level and approved in advance by the economics advisor. Graduate credit is not given for ECON 403 ECONOMICS FOR DECISION MAKERS. Students with strong preparation in economics may be able to enroll directly in ECON 465 ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY and/or skip ECON 436 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS and enroll directly in ECON 446 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS, subject to approval by the economics advisor.

Students considering the thesis option are strongly encouraged to take Rhetoric and Writing in Economics.

Non-Thesis Option

Five electives, including at least three 400-level economics courses15
ECON 421MACROECONOMIC THEORY3
ECON 423MICROECONOMIC THEORY3
ECON 436QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS3
ECON 440ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY3
ECON 446INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS3
ECON 463MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS3
ECON 465ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY3
Total Credit Hours36

Thesis Option

Four electives, including at least two 400-level economics courses12
ECON 421MACROECONOMIC THEORY3
ECON 423MICROECONOMIC THEORY3
ECON 436QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS3
ECON 440ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY3
or ECON 465 ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY
ECON 446INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS3
ECON 463MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS3
ECON 490THESIS3
Total Credit Hours33

A student who has not completed the thesis must maintain continued registration during fall and spring semesters until completion of the thesis by registering for the appropriate zero-credit course (course number followed by “Y”). Students who have not maintained continuous registration for the thesis will be required to register for all intervening fall and spring semesters prior to graduation.